January 22, 2022

Old Places

Where we study the past to define our future

The Licensed Premises of Big Hill, Wallan Wallan and Wallan East – inc. Publicans, Licensees and Owners (period 1845c-1939)

Over a period of just under 100 years up until the commencement of the second world war there had been no fewer than 24 licensed Hotels, Inns and Public houses in and around Wallan Wallan.  Several premises had name changes over the years, whilst in addition a licensees surname on occasions substituted the licensed premises name……..  In addition there were other premises such as General Stores that held a ‘Beer License’ that enabled the proprietor to sell alcohol provided that no bottles were opened and/or consumed on the premises – on occasions such premises were prosecuted for not adhering to this law.

Licensees, publicans, hotel/innkeepers and the like, had to apply annually for the renewal of their licenses, likewise this also applied to the general storekeeper wishing to sell beer over the counter.  The exception to this being special refreshment licenses could also be granted for short periods for such occasions as horse race meetings, ploughing matches, agricultural shows and the like – so that alcohol could legally be sold and consumed on site.

A Licensing Reduction Board (LRB) was formed in 1906 in response to The Temperance Movement’s campaigning against the ‘evils of drink’.  It was acknowledged that there far too many licensed in the state and over a ten year period the Board (1906 to 1916) delicensed 1527 hotels in Victoria.   Such premises were advised if they were under consideration to having to surrender their license – with each licensee being able to ‘state their case’ as to why their license should be renewed.    Should a licensees application prove unsuccessful and a license be deprived the LRB then made a one off payment of compensation to the licensee.  At least two licensed premises in Wallan Wallan were delicensed by the LRB in this period.

Some hotel licensees/owners who did not wish to lose their license to trade in this period, would on occasion spend a lot of money on extensive renovations in improving their premises in hope that the LRD would then look upon their license renewal application favourably. At least one Wallan Wallan Hotel did exactly this, but to no avail as their renewal license was not granted for the following year.

INDEX         DETAILS
Part 1List of Hotels / Inns –  

Upon Big Hill
Wallan Wallan  
The the South of Wallan Wallan 
The East of Wallan Wallan
Part 2 Map of the Hotel / Inn Locations
Part 3Licensed Premises upon Big Hill –  

Smiths ‘House of Entertainment’ (1845c-1848c)
Budds Hig Hill Hotel (1851-1852/54c)  
Refreshment Tents x 2 (1855)  
Dwyers/O’Dwyers Big Hill Hotel (1858c-1872)
Part 4Licensed Premises within the township of Wallan Wallan –  

Map of Hotels within township   
Strangeways Hotel (1854c – 1868c)  
McLeods Ardvreck Hotel (1855c-1861c)  
Mossmans Hotel (1860-1862)  
Unlicensed Premises – Hugh Sinclair’s Store (1863  & 1865)  

O’Dwyers / Woodmans Arms Hotel (1874-1935)
and as Wallan Hotel (1937 to present day)  

Maguires Hotel (1874)  
Mac’s Hotel (1866c-1904) rebuilt as the Tower Hotel (1905-1916)  
Prince of Wales Hotel later named Camerons Hotel (1873-1894c)

Parkers Hotel & Parkers Colonial Wine License &
Billiard Hall (1888 to 1891c)
Part 5Licensed Premise to the South of Wallan Wallan –  

Cameron Hotel/Inverlochy Castle Hotel (1850c-1909)
Part 6Licensed Premises to the East of Wallan Wallan –

Gap Inn (1860c-1861)  
Gap Inn (1862c-1864c) – at new location

Wyatt’s Store (1864c-1867) and
Wyatt’s Store with Beer License (1868-1871)  

Rose & Crown Hotel (1872-1905)  
Royal Oak Hotel (1870 -1874c)  
Railway Hotel (1874c-2019c)    
Part 7 Summary –

Year by Year Licensed Premises

List of Hotel Fires
Part 8Misc
Part 9Reference Sources  

Part 1 – List of Hotels/Inns

HOTELS (‘upon’ Big Hill)YEARS
LICENSED
OTHER NAMES THE PREMISES
WERE KNOWN BY & LOCATION
SMITH’S
‘HOUSE OF ENTERTAINMENT’
(on SMITH’S STATION)
1845c to
1847/48c
Half way up Big Hill – these premises were legally conducted (this story has already been covered in a separate article at https://oldplaces.com.au/pretty-sally-upon-big-hill so will be omitted here)
BUDDS BIG HILL HOTEL/
STRANGEWAYS INN/HOTEL
(on BUDDS STATION)
– at first location
15 April
1851 to
May 1854    
Half way up Big Hill – on the site of Smiths former ‘House of Entertainment’  
By May 1854 these premises were closed and WH Budd’s transferred his publicans license to his newly opened and same named Strangeways Inn/Hotel (formerly was a house) at the foot of Big Hill
REFRESHMENT LICENSES (X2)1855Precise location upon Big Hill and other details are not known
O’DWYERS (BIG HILL) HOTEL
– second location
(ref to as Dwyers on occasion)
1858
to
1872
Situated upon the top of Big Hill (period 1862/1863 possibly the short lived name of the STAR & GARTER HOTEL ?
HOTELS
(Wallan Wallan)
within the township
YEARS
LIC.
HOTEL
FIRES
OTHER NAMES THE
PREMISES WERE
KNOWN BY &
LOCATION
STRANGEWAYS HOTEL  
(also recorded as an Inn)
– second location
May
1854c
to
1868
 also known as Budds Station / Budds Public
House / Pretty Sally Hotel (1857) / Budds Hotel Big Hill(1859) / Halls Strangeways Hotel / Wallan Wallan Hotel

one reference from 1859 records to Budds Hotel of Big Hill, Beveridge
McLEODS
ARDVRECK HOTEL
1855c
to
1861c
 also known as McLeods Hotel / Halls Hotel / Wallan Wallan Hotel
MOSSMANS HOTEL1860
to
1862
 also known as the Wallan Wallan Hotel
UNLICENSED PREMISES’
(Hugh Sinclair’s General
Store and Post Office at
the former Mossman
Hotel)
1863
&
1865
  
DWYERS HOTEL /
O’DWYERS HOTEL /
WOODMANS ARMS
HOTEL /
MURRAYS HOTEL /
WALLAN HOTEL 
1874
to
1935
&
1937
to
date
1926
(saved)
&
1935
 
MACS HOTEL
(BEER SHOP)
1866c
to
1873
  ))
McDONALD’S
HOTEL /
CAMPBELL’S
HOTEL (?)
1874
to
1905
1888
&
1895
))  –same
)) premises   x3 —
KEAMS
(TOWER HOTEL)
1905
to
1916
1926))  also known as
Grand Hotel /
Jacksons Hotel
PRINCE OF
WALES HOTEL
1873
to
1894c
after
1894
also known as 
Heaneys Hotel /
Camerons Hotel
MAGUIRES HOTEL1874  ocation not
known ?
(Walter) PARKERS
HOTEL and
BOARDING HOUSE                       
& (Mrs Walter)
PARKERS –
COLONIAL WINE
LICENSE &
BILLIARD HALL
1888
to
1892c
 possibly both at same location and situated on the SW corner of Watson St & Sydney Rd  ?
HOTEL (to the South
of the Wallan Wallan
Township)
YEARS
LICENSED
OTHER NAMES THE PREMISES
WERE KNOWN BY & LOCATION
CAMERONS HOTEL
/ INVERLOCHY
CASTLE HOTEL
1850c to
1909
(one mile south of Wallan Wallan)
– possibly opened as early as 1850c
(the Inverlochy story has been
covered in a separate article within
oldplaces.com.au – by Richard
Cooper/Connors Roberts)
HOTELS (to the East of
Wallan Wallan township)
YEARS
LIC.
HOTEL
FIRES
OTHER NAMES THE PREMISES
WERE KNOWN BY & LOCATION
THE GAP INNJuly
1860c
 1861About 1 mile south of Woodstock & (Gap) Upper Plenty Rds
junction.  Premises were rebuilt in 1862 on a different Allotment on the SE cnr of the junction detailed above.    
THE GAP INN
(new premises at

different location)
1862c1864cSE cnr of Woodstock & (Gap) Upper Plenty Rds junction
BEER LICENSE
(at Wyatt’s store)
1868
to
1871c
 SE cnr of Woodstock & (Gap) Upper Plenty Rds junction
ROSE & CROWN
HOTEL
1872
to
1905
1895
&
1905
NW cnr of ‘T’ junction at north end of Wallan East and the Lightwood Flat / Wandong Rds – Premises were rebuilt after fire 
ROYAL OAK
HOTEL (1870c to
1874/80c)
1870c
to
1874c
 also known as Johnston’s Royal Oak Hotel / Johnston’s Railway Hotel /  Heggin’s Hotel / Railway Hotel / Parkers Hotel
RAILWAY HOTEL
(1874/80c to
2019c)
1874c
to
2019c
 Opposite the Wallan East Railway Stn

Part 2 – Map of Hotel locations

A = O’Dwyers Big Hill Hotel (1858-1872)
also two Refreshment Tent Licenses were granted for upon Big Hill in 1855 of which no further details are known
B= Smiths ‘House of Entertainment’ (1845c-1848) & Budd’s Big Hill Hotel (1851-1854c)
C= Strangeways Hotel (1854-1868)
D= Mac’s Hotel (1867-1904) & Tower Hotel (1905-1916)
E = O’Dwyer’s / Woodman Arms Hotel (1874c-1935) & Wallan Hotel (1937 and still open today as Hogan’s)
F = Mossman’ Hotel (1860-1862) & Hugh Sinclairs unlicensed store (1863 &1865)
G= Parkers Hotel/ Colonial Wine License and Billiard Hall with Boarding House (1888-1892c)
H = Prince of Wales / Cameron’s Hotel (1873-1894)
I = McLeod’s Ardvreck Hotel (1855c-1861c)
J = Cameron’s Hotel (1850c-1854) & Inverlochy Castle Hotel (1854-1909)
K = Rose and Crown Hotel (1872-1905)
L = Railway Hotel (between 1874/80 – 2019c)
M = Royal Oak Hotel (1870 – between 1874/80)
N= Gap Inn – at second location (1862c-1964c)
O = Gap Inn at first location (1860c-1861)

also Maguire’s Hotel at unknown location (1874)was possibly the licensee at one of the above hotels ?
________________________________________

As intrepid settlers, land speculators and travellers moved further inland there became more and more licensed premises were built along the route from Melbourne along the Kilmore, Plenty, Broadmeadows Rds and beyond to cater for the demand of feed, drink, accommodation, stabling and change of horses, blacksmithing, mail transfers and the like etc. Cobb & Co and other ‘horse changing stations’ soon were to establish themselves with their stagecoaches with regular ‘stops’ every 12  or so miles apart along each route it travelled.

From Pentridge along the Kilmore Rd (later Sydney Rd) there were from the earliest of times hotels at regular intervals en route from Melbourne Town to Wallan Wallan/Big Hill and thence beyond.  With licensed premises over varying ‘early years’ at – 

 – Pentridge, Campbellfield, Somerton, Craigieburn (with Cobb & Co. Stn), Kinlochewe, Rocky Water Holes (later renamed Donnybrook, then Kal Kallo), Mercer’s Vale (Beveridge).

– Broadmeadows, Yuroke, Mickleham, Darraweit Guim Tollgate

– Epping, Wollert, Woodstock and thence to Merriang (with a Cobb & Co. Stn).________________________________

Part 3 – Licensed Premises upon Big Hill

SMITHS HOUSE OF ENTERTAINMENT (1845c-1847/48)

This article will not go into detail regarding the earliest premises upon the side of Big Hill which were Mrs Smiths licensed ‘House of Entertainment’ on Smiths Station– as this subject has hopefully been more than adequately covered in the ‘Mrs Pretty Sally Smith upon Big Hill’ article (uploaded to oldplaces.com.au in Oct 2021). 

Smith’s Station and the location of Smiths ‘House of Entertainment’ (1845c-1848)
– located half way up Big Hill –

________________________________

BUDDS HOTEL (1851 to 1852/54c)

In May 1850 it was recorded that touching the passage of the Big Hill, there is no place, between Melbourne and Sydney, which calls so much for a ‘House of Entertainment’, as upon the site formerly occupied by ‘Pretty Sally’, and it is generally understood that the Squatting License was originally granted in that locality upon the express understanding that, such an establishment should be kept up.

Indeed not long after this reference is made that’s WH Budd should have by now opened a ‘House of Entertainment’ as per his obligation under the terms of his squatting license, but had failed to do so.

On 6 February 1851 Big Hill was burnt out in the horrific fire that later was termed as Black Thursday.  It is recorded that ‘it took great exertions the dwelling house was saved, but that Mr Budd had been a great sufferer with the loss of his dairy produce of the season that totalled several hundred pounds’.  

On 15 April 1851 WH Budd was granted a license and he opened Budds Big Hill Hotel – located half way up Big Hill (on the site of Smith’s former ‘House of Entertainment’ and the former Smith Station). As to if Budd’s dwelling ‘house’ though is one and the same building as Budd’s Hotel, Big Hill it cannot be categorically said as being so.

Budd Homestead (believed also to be the site of the original
Budds Big Hotel/Strangeways Hotel for up to 4 yrs)
PremisesLicenseOwnerEarliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
Budds Big Hill
Hotel
WH BuddRH Broadhurst
& AD Tootal
15
April
1851
Budds Big Hill
Hotel  (aka
Strangeways
Inn/Hotel)
on Budds Stn
WH BuddWH BuddMay
1854
May 1854 – the license was transferred to WH Budds newly opened and same named Strangeways Inn/ Hotel (formerly a
house) at foot of Big Hill

As to why RH Broadhurst & AD Tootal are recorded as the ‘owner’ of the land on which Budd first opened his Big Hill Hotel in April 1851 is not known per this research – but eludes to the possibility that the premises were actually on the Belle Vue Run ? 

Just maybe Budd initially utilised a building on this Run for a short period of time ? 

Per the above map, it does appear to detail Broadhurst & Tootal holding the former Station of Joseph Smith and that which also encompassed the part of the Big Hill run held by WH Budd that later became his southern pre-emptive right (from 1854)……

William Hartley BUDD (1812-1888)

REFRESHMENT LICENSES (1855)

Both of these licensees remain a bit of a ‘mystery’ but were possibly granted to fill in the void of there no longer being any licenses premises upon Big Hill ? Alternatively such licenses were also applied for when specific events were to be held – such as a horse racing meeting, ploughing events and other agricultural meetings or similar and were only for the duration of such an occasion.

PremisesLicenseOwnerEarliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
‘Refreshment Tent’
(Big Hill)
George Cook
/Cooke
    –license granted
June 1855
1855
Refreshment LicenseGeorge Hill    –18551855

Both George Cook/Cooke and George Hill names thereafter disappear from any further records in the District.

The surname of Dwyer first became associated with Big Hill some eight years after Michael and Bridget Dwyer along with their family had arrived in the Colony on 13 Oct 1850 and later took up selections upon Big Hill in possibly late 1857.

Shipping records of the DWYER family from Lattreagh Co. Tipperary
 arrival in the Port Phillip District on 13 Oct 1850 per ‘Kate’
Michael 1810, Bridget 1813c, Michael 1832, Mary 1834, Eliza 1936,
Edmund 1838 John 1839 Patrick 1839, Thomas 1841

Indeed there was also once an inn/hotel on the top of Big Hill (part of was earlier referred to as Long Hill, and was the name of a very early run, nowadays is almost exclusively known as Pretty Sally Hill) in Dwyers/O’Dwyers Big Hill Hotel which was licensed from at least Feb 1858c through to 1872c.   

At some point the Dwyer name became O’Dwyer, though but nothing more is known why this was the case – certainly the family when they arrived in the Colony in 1850 and were recorded as Dwyer, and again when land was selected in 1857 upon Big Hill.

It appears that the Government of the day had a vision in that Big Hill would indeed become a township for some importance.  But like several other tracts of land that were Surveyed and Gazetted in the District, nothing lasting or substantial came ‘of it’, as Big Hill soon was’ retired’ to more pastoral interests and concerns, especially after Wallan Wallan was Surveyed and Gazetted in  1853. Several other ‘townships’ were ‘surveyed’ in the district had been surveyed that also came to nothing or very little.

Dwyers/O’Dwyers Big Hill Hotel (1858 to 1872)
 – a modern day new road alignment was opened in the 1960s to the East of the long gone former Hotel, and it curved back around to the old alignment just to the north of the culvert that is detailed on the above map(to the south of Arkells Lane –
Dwyers/O’Dwyers Big Hill Hotel (1858 to 1872)
thick black line = the approx. modern day new road alignment opened in the 1960s

O’DWYERS (BIG HILL) HOTEL (1858c to 1872)

–  the premises were built of brick and stone, some footings of the former  Dwyers/O’Dwyers Big Hill Hotel were purportedly still clearly visible in the mid 20th Century. As to the eventual fate of the former Hotel and its ‘destruction’ is not known.

PremisesLicensee OwnerEarliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
Nett
Value
£
Dwyers /
O’Dwyers
Big Hill
Hotel
Michael
O’Dwyer
(?)
Michael
O’Dywer
bef.
1859
1859 
 dittoRichard
O’Dwyer
Michael
O’Dwyer
Aug
1859
  
 dittoMichael
O’Dwyer
Michael
O’Dwyer
1860  
Dwyers
Big Hill
Hotel
Richard
O’Dwyer
Michael
O’Dwyer
Aug
1861
Dec 
1862
Star &
Garter
Hotel *

This Hotel
name
remains a
mystery
‘of sorts’
Richard O’Dwyer
with reference to
a Patrick Smith
(and his house)

Michael
O’Dwyer
Aug
1862
Nov
1863
 
O’Dwyers
Big Hill
Hotel
Richard
O’Dwyer
Michael
O’Dywer
Jan
1864
Jan
1865
 50
dittoRichard
O’Dwyer
_
O’Dwyer
Jan
1866
Dec
1870
 
dittoThomas
Weeks
_
O’Dwyer
Jan
1871
Dec
1871
 
dittoMichael
O’Dwyer
_
O’Dwyer
 Jan
1872
bef.
Sept
1872
**
 

* The Star & Garter Hotel there is a ‘gap’ in O’Dwyer’s Big Hill Hotel records in this immediate period.  There was a  Patrick Smith recorded as at both the Victoria Hotel (Bylands) sand the Star & Garter in 1863. Previously per this research it was thought that O’Dwyers Big Hill Hotel may not have been licensed in 1863, but per this find maybe was not the case. A reference too is to be found with this Hotel being at/in Mr Smith’s old house (no connection with Mr & Mrs Smith of the former ‘House of Entertainment upon Big Hill’). The license and owner of the Star & Garter Hotel in 1863 are recorded as Richard O’Dwyer as the licensee and Michael O’Dwyer as the owner – another convenient fit that these the premises upon Big Hill in 1863 were in fact O’Dwyers Big Hill Hotel.

** the Rates Book for Sept 1872 records Michael O’Dwyer as a farmer of 355 acres on Big Hill.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-32.png
Licencee & Owner recorded as Richard & Michael O’Dwyer – so possibly was a short lived name of O’Dwyers Big Hill Hotel.

There is a Michael Dwyer recorded as a farmer of Kilmore in March 1855 (no other details known).

The passing of Patrick and Richard O’Dwyer

There are conflicting records online regarding some of the O’Dwyer family and indeed regarding when the above two O’Dwyers passed away, This research concludes that –

16 Oct 1872 Patrick Dwyer passed away at Wallan Wallan aged 45 (native of Derry. Co Tipperary, Ireland)

Early Dec 1912 Richard O’Dwyer passed away at Boosey nr Yarrawonga (83yo)

__________________________

It is also very possible however that Michael Dwyer/O’Dwyer had interests in the hotel business before arriving at Big Hill, as follows –

DateOwnerHotel – Cnr of
Gardiner Creek
& Punt Rds
Other details
April 1854Michael
Dwyer
Yarra Hotel,
Richmond
License Granted – on the
condition that the building
be finished by 1 Sept 1854
April 1855Michael
Dwyer
Yarra Hotel,
Richmond
License Renewal – Granted
April 1856Michael
Dwyer
Yarra Hotel,
Richmond
License Renewal – Granted

By 1859 the Yarra Hotel had been renamed the Yarra Club Hotel.  The address of the hotel on the corner of Gardiner Creek and Punt Rds, later became 119 Cremorne St, Richmond.

There were 17 licensed premises in Richmond when Michael Dwyer/O’Dwyer obtained the first license for the Yarra Hotel. By 1859 the Yarra Hotel had been renamed the Yarra Club Hotel but later returned to is former name.  The original building was demolished and rebuilt in 1909, with the license being surrendered at the end of 1916.  The premises then became a factory that made rubber goods, and later became a private residence.

The original Yarra Hotel, Richmond premises are recorded as
being the building behind the brewery buildings (1873)
The  former Yarra Hotel (rebuilt 1909) at 119 Cremorne St, Richmond
(the Yarra Hotel –  was licensed from 1854 to 1916)

LOST WALLET

The ARGUS Fri 30 November 1866

In the early 1860s it was reported that the worst portion of the Sydney Rd in the immediate Wallan Wallan District was always the road at Gleesons Swamp (aka as Beveridge Swamp) near the Gleeson Inn Hotel in Beveridge, an eternal ‘glue pot’ in and after inclement weather, as too was the swampland at Hearnes near todays Wallan East.  and the road on the long haul up Pretty Sally’s Hill, with it being a great relief to reach Dwyer/O’Dwyer’s Hotel on the top of Big Hill. The descent is also recorded as being just as precarious at this time as well – this indeed being so until the newroad alignment was opened in the 1960s

Part 4 – Licensed Premises within the township

of Wallan Wallan

From a early Wallan Wallan township plan (1857) at which time only the Strangeways and McLeods Hotels were open
– map super-imposes the location of all Hotels known within the Township (excluding Maguires)

STRANGEWAYS HOTEL – at second/new location  (1852/54c to 1868)

(also known as Budds Station / Budds Public House / Halls Strangeways Hotel / Wallan Wallan Hotel)

– at the junction where the track to Whittlesea/Woodstock, Beveridge /Donnybrook (Kal Kallo), Broadmeadows and Kilmore Rds originally met.  That is the NW corner of today’s Northern Hwy and Wallan-Romsey Rd

It is recorded that the old house at the foot of Big Hill had been renovated extensively, complete with a front new facade, before the premises were relocated and opened there.

William Hartley Budd a native of Kent (though more latterly of Lancashire) left England via Liverpool on 6 Dec 1832 onboard the ‘Hibernia’ with his half brother Nathaniel and their parents.  On 5 Feb 1833 shortly after having crossed the equator (often an occasion/time of frivolity and celebration) the ship caught fire and the vessel was totally destroyed (thus sank).  There were three lifeboats on the ship (room for only 79 persons), thus the remainder of the passengers and crew totaling 153 soles. William and Nathaniel were saved, alas they were now orphans.   For 6 days the life boats made for Pernambucco, Brazil, which was the closest land fall. Their lifeboat was picked up by the ‘Lotus’, a prison ship bound to Van Diemens Land.    The survivors we spotted and picked up by the convict transport ‘Adelaide’ and arrived at Rio Janeiro on 22 Feb 1833 .  On the following morning the ’Isabella’ came in with the boat which contained the other passengers who were saved.  For the following two weeks William and Nathaniel stayed at the naval boarding house in Rio after which they boarded the convict transport ship that had saved them in the ‘Adelaide, bound for Hobart Town where they arrived in May.  Here they remained until Oct 1838.  

By now married William landed in Melbourne town in 1838 and met up Thomas Graham who was also a survivor from the ‘Hibernia’ (they had remained in contact over the 5 preceeding years, and indeed they remained in contact until Thomas death in 1871)  At about this time Thomas had bought the Bush Inn whilst William and his family settled at Kinlochewe in 1844 on some 160 acres, and they remained for several years.  William later brought the Inn there (the Inn having been built sometime between Feb and Oct 1840), it was quite a substantial building made from brick and timber.  It boasted 14 rooms, ample stabling, 108 acres of grazing land, 50 acres of arable land and an orchard.

In a Dec 1879 WH Budd was interviewed by the Weekly Times magazine, and he claimed that he first came to Big Hill in 1846.

Later Budd acquired the Run at Big Hill from 1847/48c that was formerly held by Joseph Smith (Smiths Station) the husband of Sarah, the latter who is better remembered today as Pretty Sally. Indeed after the death of Joseph Smith in 1849 followed by that of Sarah in 1851, WH Budd administered the latter’s probate.

As to the precise date that Mr Budd moved his licensed premises from mid way up Big Hill to the foot of the same, cannot be exactly determined – it was sometime between 1852 and 1854, very likely in was actually in May 1854*.  The Wallan Wallan township had not been not surveyed until 1853, and up until this time the locality of  Big Hill was most frequently used (though there are however several isolated references to the name Wallan Wallan that can be found pre 1853).  

* the Strangeways Hotel at the foot of the Big Hill (according to JW Payne) was opened on 11 May 1854.  Though it may have been sometime before this date ?  Indeed there is a record to be found from August 1852 with reference to Budds Station at the foot of Big Hill (and not half way up).

PremisesLicensee
&
Owner
Earliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
LandNett
Value
£
Strangeways
Hotel
(Big Hill)  
also
recorded
as a Inn
WH
Budd
Aug
1852
  
Budds Stn.WH BuddSept
1852
May
1854
 
Strangeways
Hotel
(Big Hill)
WH Budd
(inn-
keeper)
11
May
1854
  
Budds
Public House
WH Budd
(inn-
keeper)
15
June
1855
  
Budds HotelWH BuddNov
1856
  
Budds Public
House/
Strangeways
Hotel
WH BuddMay
1857
June
1857
 
also recorded
as
Strangeways
Big Hill /
Halls
Strangeways
Hotel
WH Buddduring
1857
  
Budds Big
Hill Hotel
(recorded as
at Beveridge)
/ Halls
Strangeways
Hotel
Angus &
Thomas
Hall
(father
&
son)

owner
– WH Budd
1858bef.
May
1861
 
Halls
Strangeways
Hotel
Thomas
Hall
owner
– WH Budd
bef.
May
1861
1862 
dittoThomas
Hall

owner
– WH Budd
May
1862
 167
acres
(for
Let)
Strangeways
Hotel
owner
– WH Budd
1862 165
acres
(inc
farm)
 ditto  owner
– WH Budd
1863 171
acres
(inc
farm)
Budds Hotel
/
Wallan Wallan
Hotel
Nathaniel
Templeman
Randell

owner
– WH Budd
Sept
1864
 171
acres
(inc
farm)
Budds HotelNathaniel
Templeman
Randell
(hotel
hand)

owner
– WH Budd
1865  
 dittoNathaniel
Templeman
Randell /
John
Hollings-
worth
Clay

owner
– WH Budd
1866 85
(&
land)
 dittoNathaniel
Templeman
Randell

owner
– WH Budd
Sept
1867
 60
(inc
farm)
 dittoJohn
Hollings-
worth
Clay
(last
licensee)

owner
– WH Budd
Sept
1868
poss.
closed
at the
end of
Dec
1868
?
60
(inc
farm)
General
Store
WH Budd
(Jnr)
Store-
keeper
Sept
1869
Sept
1870
14

In 1852 the hotel was of some 15 rooms, exclusive of those required by the family

Early references to Strangeway’s at Big Hill were made as Wallan Wallan was not proclaimed until 1853 ?

1 April 1858 the Wallan Wallan Post Office opened with Thomas Hall jnr as the postmaster.

Reference Sept 1859 to Budd’s old house – regarding the East Bourke Elections (and address to the Electors)

April 1859 the Strangeways homestead is referred to as Strangeways Hall.

May 1860 some 200 persons attended the Wallan Wallan ball, at Strangeway’s Hotel, in which Thomas Hall spared no expense to make it a great success.

Period 1860- 1862, Thomas Hall was also an Agent for the sale and receiving of subscriptions for several Melbourne newspapers.

May 1861 the Strangeways Hotel with 167 acres was offered ‘For Let’.

25 June 1869 Angus Hall (farmer) passed away age 60 at home in Wallan Wallan.

____________________________________

26 Nov 1910 at the Merriang Shire Council Meeting – from W Knott, Wallan Wallan, asking for a reduction in the valuation of property known as Strangeways as the house has been removed.  To be attended to.

____________________________________

From a 1917 Manuscript titled Early Day Experiences by George Frederick Sugden (1841-1922)

On 1 April 1849 Joshua Sugden (1816-1869) and his four young children arrived at the Port Phillip District on board the ‘Lord George Bentnick’, tragically his wife died on the voyage.  Also on board may have been Joshua’s wife’s father.  Joshua later held a Station at Rands Water Hole near Big Hill (approx. in the mid to late 1850s), with Budd’s Station on one side and Broadhurst Station on the other. 

The family were later to be found living in Port Melbourne and George Frederick later took up work on a Station some 300 miles from Melbourne.  On commencing his journey there he got as far as Big Hill and pulled up at the end of the first day at a wayside inn which had not been there when my father had his Station close by.  

I asked the Innkeeper if he could put myself and horse up for the night ?

He replied, “Yes, my boy, if you can pay for it.” 

I didn’t tell him I had only 25/-, but put my horse in the stable, fed it, and sat down to tea. 

After tea the man said, “Well, you don’t look like a boy that will get up at three in the morning and make off for Bendigo without paying.”

“Oh no sir”, I said, “I will pay you now.”  I then found that if I paid for breakfast half of my money would be gone, so I told him that as I would be starting long before he was up, I would pay him for my horse, my bed and tea, and get my breakfast further along the road. 

After tea I got talking with the Innkeeper, who looked a kindly man, and I asked him if he ever knew a Mr Budd who once owned a cattle station next to Rand’s Water Hole ? 

He said, “Oh, you mean Sugden’s old station.  He had four boys and a daughter and no wife.  A drought came on and his sheep got the scab and then selectors came on his run.” 

“Yes, sir”, I said, “that was my father’s Run.”

“Well” said the man, “I’ve been wondering where I’ve seen you before, but you and your brothers were very small then.”  He talked of father but evidently did not think much of his managership as he was so often in Melbourne and left so much to his overseer.  He also said that the overseer used to go too often to Kilmore and get drunk and take my eldest brother with him.

I agreed with that and told him how, when the shepherds would run away to the gold fields, I and my brothers would have to work the sheep.  I told him also how I would have to take my sheep to a place about two miles from Budd’s old station home and there round them up and give four sheep to the contractor, who was at that time making a road to Bendigo. 

“Well” said the man “that was my Station and I am Mr Budd.  Your father had all hilly country and mine was all lovely flats.  The selectors came along and took up all my flats, so that I was only left with my home paddock.  I built a new front to the old house and turned it into this Inn.” 

This event almost certainly was at the Strangeways Hotel.

____________________________________

Fatal Shot at Strangeway’s

Manslaughter Verdict Overturned

On Thursday 3 February 1870 a William Scott a farmer who lived at Strangeways, shot Timothy Ward, a 17 year old man of unsound mind. Ward had called in at the farm of the Scott family and was armed with a heavy stick.  At home were Mrs Scott and her children, and the deceased is said to have threatened to take Mrs Scott’s life swinging a large stick over her head, he had asked ‘for a shake down’ threatened to burn down the shacks and he also said that he wanted some money.  Mrs Scott quickly despatched her 12 year old daughter in Ellen to get her father who was at a neighbors. 

Within a few minutes Mr Scott was nearly home when he saw the deceased walking leisurely away across the paddock.  He walked quietly to the house and brought out a double barrel shotgun which he loaded and ran after Ward.  He was then joined by two other young men in James Ferguson and George Kyle who were both armed with sticks, and the three gave chase – after about a quarter of a mile they caught up to Ward.   

Ward was the called about to‘stand’, however he did not immediately see the three men.  Once he saw them he asked ‘what do ye all want with me, following me with a gun?’  Scott then asked ‘what you been doing with my misses?’  The deceased replied with ‘nothing, I have been looking for work’.  There were then other exchanges made, after which Ward then approached Scott and his struck him with his stick. The blow knocked Scott to the ground, and one of the young men then stepped forward and aimed a blow at the deceased, but missed him.  Ward then attempted to strike Scott with another blow as he was getting up.  Scott then fired the shotgun with deadly effect, the shot hitting Ward in the left eye and produced instantaneous death. 

The body of the deceased in the interum was taken to Strangeways Hotel where a inquest was held on the following day.

Scott then proceed immediately to Kilmore and gave himself into the custody of Sergeant Denis Deany.  Saying that he had fired in self defence – he was then conveyed to the lockup.  The case was immediately put before a jury which were ‘locked up’ all night.  By the following morning the jury were unanimous in their decision and returned the verdict of manslaughter against Scott, who was then committed for trial at the next Kilmore General Sessions.  Bail was allowed, himself at £200 and two sureties £100 each.

Michael Ward the deceased elder brother from High Camp Plain later stated that his brother had showed symptoms of insanity over the previous twelve months.  Only two days earlier he had not been in the right frame of mind, and had struck a younger brother with blow to the head using a stick.  He then gave the information to the local police, but they were unable to find him.  The following day the Sergeant advised him to get a warrant for his brother’s arrest as a lunatic, which he duly did.  They police managed to trace him from place to place and to the neighborhood to within a few miles of where he was shot – but were unable to find him.

The verdict given by the jury was considered a most extraordinary one, with a verdict of manslaughter was recorded against Scott.  It was considered that the deceased was in such a weak state that his capture could have been effected by almost anyone – yet Scott had placed the muzzle of a shotgun close to the deceased head and blew away a portion of his forehead. 

At the Kilmore General Court Session on 14 March id was argued that Scott’s actions surely were either that of willful murder or justifiable homicide – that to find Scott guilty of manslaughter was most extraordinary indeed.  After hearing all arguments the jury then retired –  after only one hour deliberation found the prisoner not guilty.

His Honor then discharged the prisoner, remarking that he ought to be more careful in future.

_____________________________

The Strangeways Hotel is believed to have been delicenced sometime around 1868, however several other periodic references are to be found regarding premises name as follows –

PremisesOwnerEarliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
ReferenceNett
Value
£
General
Store
 WH BuddSept
1869
Sept
1870
WH Budd
Jnr
store-
keeper
14
Strangeways
Hotel
WH Budd
(victualler)
May
1870
 (see
below)
32
dittoWH BuddSept
1871
Sept
1873
Rates
Book
32
dittoWH BuddNov
1871
Reference
to ‘Old
Strange-
ways
Hotel’
(see below)
dittoWH BuddOct
1873
   
ditto WH BuddNov
1873
Sept
1874
Rates
Book
25
dittoWH BuddSept
1875
 Rates
Book
32
Budds HotelWH Budd1876   
Strangeways
Hall
 1876   

It is highly unlikely that the Strangeways Hotel ever, later reapplied for its license again after 1868c

per above chart – Advertisement in May 1870 for the Auction of livestock & the premises also bering recorded as a Hotel in Bailliere’s Gazetteer and Road Guide (1870) – possibly/likely the Guide had not been correctly updated ?

Tues 28 Nov 1871 Tuesday afternoon the foundation stone of a Rechabite Hall was laid, at Wallan Wallan nearly opposite the old Strangeways Hotel.  Whether the fact of Temperance temples taking the place of hotels in small townships may be considered as denoting material prosperity, we know not, but certainly this step of our Wallan Wallan neighbours may be taken at least as an earnest of their desire to become a sober race, and if the Chief Rulers and other officers and members should continue to keep moderately sober they may, by this good example induce others do likewise.

The passing of Angus Hall (1868) and his son Thomas Hall (1885)

Angus Hall born 1808c Glengarry, Inverness, Scotland) passed away on 21 January 1869 at Wallan Wallan, due to a disease of the liver. On 21 January 1869 the burial also at Wallan Wallan was witnessed by Thomas Hall and Hugh Sinclair. He was also recorded that he had been in the Colony of Victoria for 13 years.

Thomas Hall passed away on 24 August 1885 at Wallan Wallan, late of Yea and native of Torboil, Dornoch, Sutherlandshire, Scotland (born 29 Sept 1835).  See below –

The Argus Friday 28 August 1885

The passing of WH Budd (1888) , John Hollingsworth Clay (1891) and Nathaniel Templeton Randall (1912)

5 Nov 1888 – WH Budd passed away at hid residence the former Strangeways Hotel, aged 79 after 55 years in the Colony. Much has been written in that Budd never totally recovered after the devastation of the Black Thursday fires in Victoria in Feburary 1851, however when he passed he left an Estate of over £12000.

24 July 1891 John Hollingsworth Clay passed away at 12 Condell St, Fitzroy aged 93.

29/12/1912 Nathaniel Templeton Randall passed away in his 90th year.  He was born 1823c and had arrived in the Colony 1841, was very prominent in public affairs and served as Secretary of the Merriang Shire Council.

____________________________________

On 20 Jan 1905 the Wallan Wallan Oddfellows Lodge, Manchester Unity was opened at the former Strangeway’s Hotel, Wallan Wallan with A Sugden of Kilmore consenting to act as Grand Master for the first Sitting.

On 24 Jan 1920 Lance Corporal WJ Cummins received his MM (Military Medal), his widowed mother (wife of the late BC Cummins) at that time was living at Strangeways.

In 1924 Strangeways was sold by a public auction.  Miss Jane Stratford Orr was at that time the owner of 276 acres of WH pre-emptive right. 

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Per above – The Argus 15 Nov 1924Comfortable Brick Homestead

KFP on 4 June 1936 reported the long since demolished Strangeways Hotel (other reference sources have previously recorded that the premises were demolished in 1938).  Likely per the memory of two former residents the former Strangeways Hotel was demolished sometime in the period between 1924 and 1930 ?

McLEODS ARDVRECK HOTEL (1855c to 1861c)

also known as

Ardvreck Castle Hotel / McLeods Hotel / Halls Hotel and the Wallan Wallan Hotel

– located on the SW corner of Sydney Rd & Duke St.

The Ardvreck name in  brief  refers to Ardvreck Castle which was built by the MacLeod’s* of Assynt in the late 15th Century, and it sat on a predominant rocky promontory next to Loch of Assynt, Sutherland in NW Scotland,.  The MacLeod* name was synonymous in the Castle’s history, fighting many a Battle in its defence.  Twice the MacLeod’s* lost possession of the Castle –  the second time was in 1672 when they were defeated in a 14 day Battle against their enemies the MacKenzies of Water Ross, and John MacLeod was forced to surrender its possession.  Today Ardvreck Castle survives and sits in a ruinous condition.

The MacLeod’s at Wallan Wallan originally hailed from Invercasley, Sutherlandshire, Scotland.

 * by the time the branch of the MacLeod ancestors found their way to the Wallan Wallan District in 1852 the family were spelling the name McLeod.

ARDVRECK CASTLE
PremisesLicenseeOwnerEarliest
Known
Date
Last
Known
Date
McLeods Hotel /
Ardvreck Castle
Hotel
J McLeodAlexander McLeodbef
May
1855
  1856
Ardvreck Castle
Hotel
N McLeodAlexander McLeod ?1855 
Ardvreck HotelAlexander
McLeod
Alexander McLeod ?1855 
Ardvreck Hotel _ McLeod  Dec
1856
Halls Hotel /
Halls Public
House /  
Wallan Wallan
Hotel
Mr Hall
(poss.
Angus Hall* ?)
_  McLeod 1855Sept
1859
McLeods Hotel /
Wallan Wallan
Hotel
Hugh
McLeod Jnr.
_ McLeod 18591861
Wallan Wallan
Hotel
John Michie ? Oct
1861
 

* also of Strangeways Hotel, Wallan Wallan.

On several occasions the press had made ‘typo set errors’ with the spelling of the ‘Ardvreck’ name (as recorded above).

7 Dec 1856 Hugh McLeod Snr. was killed when he fell from his horse at the Ardvreck Hotel.

On Sat 5 Oct 1861 another John Michie funeral was held – with the procession appointed to move from his son’s residence , the the Wallan Wallan Hotel thence to his place of interment in the Melbourne General Cemetery. As to the reference to ‘residence’ implys he was the owner, licensee, employee or just a boarder at the Hotel is not known – possibly though he ‘just’ resided there ?

Map 1857 map
McLEODS ARDVRECK HOTEL (1855c to 1861) before it was extended
(opposite present day Greenhill Reserve)
– a rectangular building
McLEODS ARDVRECK HOTEL (1855c to 1861)
 (opposite present day Greenhill Reserve)
– with the original rectangular building having been extended –

Per both of the above maps (period 1855-1861) the latter appears to detail that the Hotel building was extended/enlarged in this period.

MOSSMANS HOTEL (1860 to 1862)

(also known as the Wallan Wallan Hotel)

& at the same location –

UNLICENSED  PREMISES (1863 & 1865)

Former Mossman Hotel (Wallan Wallan Hotel) 1859 to 1862
&
Unlicensed premises (general store & post office) of 1863 &1865
PremisesLicenseeOwnerEarliest DateLast
Known
Date
Nett
Value
£
Mossman’s
Wallan
Wallan
Hotel
James
Mossman
 1859Aug
1861
 
Wallan
Wallan
Hotel
James
Mossman
George
Foster ?
(became
insolvent)
Aug
1861
Feb
1862
70
(with
80
acres)
Insolvent
Estate
(Auctioned)
       –purchased by
Hugh Sinclair
10
Feb
1862
  
Unlicensed
Premises
(Store)
       –Hugh Sinclair3
March
1863
  
Unlicensed
Premises
(General
Store & P.O)
      –Hugh SinclairMay
1865
  
General
Store & P.O
       –Hugh SinclairMay
1865
Sept
1874
52
General
Store
       –Hugh Sinclair187515
June
1877
 
 ditto       –Margaret
Sinclair
16
June
1877
1883 

In 1860 shooting matches are recorded at Mossman’s Hotel.

The ARGUS Saturday 8 February 1862

Insolvent Estate of George Foster (in recent in possession of Mr Mossman)

Feb/Aug 1862 Auction – reports on the recent possession of the insolvent estate of George Foster – the Wallan Wallan Hotel and 30 acres of freehold land, with a large frontage to Sydney Rd, in the recent possession of James Mossman.  The property was purchased by Hugh Sinclair who converted the premises into a General Store.

Hugh Sinclair appealed against a conviction by the Donnybrook Court of Petty Sessions for selling sly grog on 3 March 1863 when a Revenue Detective purchased a bottle of gin (sly grog) at Sinclair’s, an unlicensed store.  The conviction was affirmed at 5 Guineas.

Great demonstrations of loyalty took place at this township. On the day preceding the celebrations, Hugh Sinclair, Esq employed bullock teams to drag timber to the top of the Green Hills for a magnificent bonfire. Tuesday was most unfavourable for display, but the good folks were nothing daunted by the weather. Mr Sinclair’s establishment was gaily decorated with flowers, flags, and evergreens, including a beautiful design over the front door, the work of Mrs Sinclair, consisting of wreaths of flowers decorating an arch with the colours of Denmark, on which were written Love — Peace, with the letters underneath V.R. beneath.  The shops and houses in the township were all gaily decorated. The Strangeways Hotel had some very elaborate ornamentation on the front of its verandah. During the day quoits and other games were carried on with considerable spirit. The Green Hill bonfire at night had a fine effect, and no doubt was visible within a circle of hundreds of miles (per The Age Fri 22 May 1863)

Hugh Sinclair (storekeeper) died 15 June 1877 aged 44 and left a large Estate.  His wife Margaret then took over the store on his passing and continued to trade until 1883.

WOODMANS ARMS HOTEL /  DWYERS HOTEL / O’DWYERS HOTEL /  WALLAN HOTEL 

(1874 to 1935 and 1937 to present day)

– on site of todays sole remaining Hotel in Wallan (now known as Hogans – who have held the license since the mid 1980s). 

Thomas O’Dwyer ran a General Store in the period 1866c to 1873. In 1874 he was granted a license and opened O’Dwyers Woodmans Arms Hotel . For the next four years he continued to operate his General Store within the hotel. From 1878 the premises continued on as a hotel only. This hotel purportedly  burnt down in 1915 (though it appears not to have been recorded in the press) and it was then rebuilt.

The new premises were later also destroyed by fire on 21 August 1935. 

In the period of 1936-1937 the Wallan Hotel was built on the same site.

PremisesLic-
ensee
OwnerEarliest
Known
Date
Last
Known
Date
Nett
Value
£
General
Store
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
(store-
keeper)
– the son
of
Michael
O’Dwyer
(publican
upon
Big Hill)
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer?
1866c25
 dittoThomas
John
O’Dwyer
(store-
keeper)
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer?
Sept
1867
 30
ditto Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
(store-
keeper)
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer?
Sept
1868
Sept
1869
 
 dittoThomas
John
O’Dwyer
(store-
keeper)
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer?
Sept
1869
Sept
1871
26
 dittoThomas
John
O’Dwyer
(store-
keeper)
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer?
1871Sept
1874
 
O’Dwyers
Hotel
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
(hotel, &
store-
keeper)
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer?
Sept
1874
Sept
1875
56
Dwyers/
O’Dwyers
Hotel
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
(hotel &
store-
keeper)
Thomas
John  
O’Dwyer
Sept
1876
187831
 ditto Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
Sept
1878
Sept
1880
 
Woodmans
Arms
Hotel
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
Sept
1880
Sept
1884
36
    ?   
(wine
License)
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
Sept
1884
Sept
1885
36
O’Dwyers
Hotel
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
Sept
1885
Sept
1886
36
Woodmans
Arms
Hotel
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
Sept
1886
Feb
1890
36
   ditto Margaret  
O’Dwyer
Margaret
O’Dwyer
Feb
1890?
aft
Sept
1896
36
   ditto Thomas
John
O’Dwyer
 18951895 
   ditto Thomas
John
&
Margaret
O’Dwyer
Margaret
O’Dwyer
bef
Sept
1897
8
Feb
1900
30
   ditto Margaret
O’Dwyer
Margaret
O’Dwyer
 9
Feb
1900
1904 
dittoJohn
O’Dwyer
1904
O’Dwyers
Hotel
Miss
Mary
Elizabeth
O’Dwyer
Miss
Mary
Elizabeth
O’Dwyer
19041905 
 ditto Mr & Mrs
Evans
_ O’Dwyer?Feb
1906
  
unknown
(1907-1909)  

1908 ref.  
to
O’Dwyers
Hotel

1908 &
& 1909
ref to
Woodmans
Arms
likely  
_ O’Dwyer
likely
_ O’Dwyer
   
O’Dwyers
Hotel
&
Wallan
(Hotel)
Margaret
O’Dwyer ?
Margaret
O’Dwyer ?
1910  
   ditto Edmund
O’Dwyer
_O’Dwyer?Year ?   
   ditto Miss
Mary
Elizabeth 
O’Dwyer
_O’Dwyer?post
1912?
  
   ditto John
Francis
O’Dwyer
(one entry
records
John’ ‘jun’
O’Dwyer)
_O’Dwyer?1912  
Premises
purportedly –
DESTROYED
IN  FIRE  1915
(sometime
after 8 Sept)  
(unknown)_O’Dwyer?to
1915
  
Woodmans
Arms
Miss
Annie
O’Dwyer
Miss
Annie
O’Dwyer
July
1916
  
Hotel
(rebuilt
premises)
Miss
Annie
O’Dwyer
&
Miss
Mary
Elizabeth
O’Dwyer
(sisters)
_O’Dwyer?Dec
1916
05
Dec
1921
 
   ditto Randolph
Blair
Forbes
 6
Dec
1921
 3
Oct
1923
 
   ditto Doris W 
Forbes
 4
Dec
1923
 June
1924
 
   ditto Thomas
Matthew
Burns
Mr & Mrs
T Burns ?
June
1924
 
   ditto  Mr & Mrs
T Burns
19241926 
FIRE AT HOTEL
(28 Feb 1926)
the premises
were saved
Mrs
Gertrude
Burns
Mr & Mrs
T Burns
March
1926
July
1927
 
Woodmans
Arms
Hotel
Leslie
Murray
Mr & Mrs
T Burns
June
1927
Woodmans
Arms /
Wallan Hotel
Thomas
Matthew
Burns /
Stephen
Buckland
(waiter)
Mr & Mrs
T Burns
July
1927
 
dittoThomas
Matthew
Burns
Mr & Mrs
T Burns
July
1927
July
1929
   ditto Elsie
Elizabeth
Spaul
Mr & Mrs
T Burns
July
1929
Feb
1931
 
Woodmans
Arms /
Murray’s
Hotel
Ellen
Honorah
Murray
&
Leslie
Murray
(Manager)
also
Albert
‘Bert’
Clarence
Murray
Mr & Mrs
T Burns
Feb
1931
1932 
Woodmans
Arms
Hotel
Mr & Mrs
T Burns
19321935
DESTROYED
IN FIRE
(21 Aug 1935)
Thomas
Matthew
Burns
(to 22
Feb 1937)
Mr & Mrs
T Burns
 21
Aug
1935
 
REBUILDING
OF HOTEL
(commenced sometime
before
April 1936)
 Mr & Mrs
T Evans
(work was
nearly
completed
by
April
1937)
   
      
Wallan Hotel
(rebuilt
premises)
Gertrude
Burns
Mr & Mrs
T Burns
22
Feb
1937
3
Sept
1937
 
dittoEdward ‘Teddy’
Benjamin
(proprietor) &
his sister
‘Madame
Loyer-Nilsson’
(possibly the
cook & maid)
4
Sept
1937
1940
O’Dwyers Hotel
/ Wallan Hotel
Edward
‘Teddy’
Benjamin
(proprietor)
& his sister
‘Madame’
Freda’ Louis
Loyer-Nilsson
nee Benjamin
(hostess)

also possibly-
Aubrey
Moton
Moss ?
Aubrey
Moton
Moss
4
Sept
1939
Dec
1940 
 
Wallan HotelEdward
‘Teddy’
Benjamin
(proprietor)
& his sister
‘Madame’
Freda Loyer-
Nilsson
nee Benjamin
(hostess)
Aubrey
Moton
Moss
Dec
1940
 

____________________________

With the Dwyer/O’Dwyer family name formerly having been associated with the Big Hill Hotel – then in later time with the Woodmans Arms Hotel in the Wallan Wallan township, the following may be of interest/assistance in ‘following this family line –

Basic DWYER /O’DWYER FamilyTree  –

(per shipping records, and selection of land upon Big Hill – was spelt DWYER)

There appears to be some possible inconsistencies regarding names and dates of some of these family members ?

Michael ‘Red’ Dwyer/O’Dwyer
(1800-1864)
m (before 1832)
Bridget Leahy
(1813c-1875)
– they arrived in Colony
in Oct 1850 with family
of the Big Hill Hotel 
 
Edmund Dwyer/O’Dwyer
(1801c-1864)
of Bylands brother Michael
(1800c-1876) who married
Bridget Leahy (1803c-1865)
at Talilk)
 are Michael & Edmund
(above)
brothers of  Patrick
and/or Richard (below)              
– or are –
Patrick and Richard
the first born sons
of Michael ?  
  
Patrick Dwyer/O’Dwyer
(1827c-1872)
 native of Derry, Co.
Tipperary, Ireland
Richard Dwyer/O’Dwyer
(1829-1912)
cannot find Richard in
any shipping arrivals.
Did he arrive in the
Colony after Michael
& Bridget Dwyer ?
of the Big Hill Hotel (later
of Boosey, a widower – he
was buried at Yarrawonga)

Known children of Michael & Bridget DWYER /O’DWYER  (per above) –

Michael Dwyer
/O’Dwyer
(1832-1895)
m 1856 Wallan Wallan
(x13 children)
Bridget _________
(1831-1888)
 
Mary Agnes Dwyer/
O’Dwyer(1834-1925)
m 1853 Vic
John Gorman Michael
(1832-1916)
lived married life at
Wallan Wallan /
Beveridge
 
Edmund ‘Mun’
Dwyer/O’Dwyer
1838-1919)
m
Alice Cummins
(1845c-      )
of the Woodmans Arms 1900c ?
previously of the Plough Inn, Forbes
on Lancefield Rd between 1873c-
Dec 1892 *
Eliza Dwyer/O’Dwyer
(1836-1925)
  
John James Dwyer/
O’Dwyer (1839-1921)
 is this the John ‘jun’ recorded in
one entry – of the Woodmans
Arms Hotel in 1912 (he would
have been 73yo though at this
time) ?
Patrick Dwyer/
O’Dwyer (1839-1917)
 of the Big Hill Hotel 
(later of Yarrawonga)
Thomas John Dwyer/
O’Dwyer (1841-1900)

m Maria Quinlan
(1840-1898) – a
native of Tipperary
& their children included –
I
I
I
Mary Elizabeth ’Dwyer
(1864-1947)

John Francis
O’Dwyer (1878-1957) 
– Grazier –
m 1919 Vic
Ella Mary Stockdale
(1879-1954)  

Annie O’Dwyer
(  –    )          

storekeeper and publican of the
Woodman Arms (same premises)
from 1866c – was an invalid in his
later years
 


later of the
Woodmans Arms Hotel
 
later of the
WoodmansArms  Hotel
 
 
 


later of the 
Woodmans Arms  Hotel

Margaret O’Dwyer
(b 1831c– 1925)
of Tipperary,
Irelandarrived
in Colony in 1848
Who is this Margaret & where
does she fit in with O’Dwyer family ?
at the
Woodmans Arms
Hotel
in the period
1891-1910

* Edmund ‘Mun’ Dwyer/O’Dwyer (1838-1919) was the licensee of the Plough Inn, Forbes on the Lancefield Rd, Forbes for many years from at least 1873 (possibly earlier) until the license was surrendered in Dec 1892 after which it is recorded that he declined to renew his license in Jan 1893.  To use his own words, “it was not worth bothering about, for the bit of business done.” The premises were valued at some £30 at the time the license was surrendered in 1892, it also served as the Forbes PO for some time and the building was still known to have been inhabited as late as 1939.  In the paddock across from the Inn, Edmund was a major supporter and official of the Forbes horse race days. 

The premises were built and originally licensed by Martin Ford (1820-1913) for purportedly some 25 years. A daughter of Martin later married John Dwyer later of Tabilk. Martin also had a daughter a spinster in Mary Agnes who d 1935 (she lived with a brother and sister in later life in Melbourne)

Thomas O’Dwyer (1841-1900) & Maria O’Dwyer( 1840-1898)
Michael (1832-1895) & Bridget (1831-1888) O’Dwyer
& x8 children
also Michael O’Dwyer (1815-1895)
Thomas O’Dwyer Victuallers license for the Woodman’s Arms Hotel, Wallan Wallan (1895)

The passing of Thomas O’Dwyer

Thomas O’Dwyer died on 8/2/1900 (licensed victualler) aged 59.  He had been  an invalid for some time having suffered from a muscular rheumatism for some time.  This disability had very much prevented him taking his customary exercise, but it was about a week before his demise his illness assumed a serious form, culminating in his death as stated, an event which cast a gloom over the whole district. He had previously, actively taken part in municipal affairs and represented the Merriang Shire.

O’Dwyers Woodmans Arms Hotel 
supporter of the Wallan Wallan Athletic Club Sports Day
KFP Thurs 24 Nov 1910

Mr & Mrs Evans (licensees 1924 to 1937) came from Archies Creek near Korumburra, South Gippsland.

____________________________________

Tuesday 3 October 1916 the Kilmore – the Police Court before

Messrs P Skehan. C Hamilton and JJL MacDougall JPs

Licensing Inspector Nolan v Annie O’Dwyer, of Wallan, for selling liquor person under the age of 16.  After hearing evidence it appeared the youth had been sent to purchase the liquor by a man named Owen McPhillips (who was living in a tent), who was charged – with having sent him for the drink, and who satisfied the court he was ailing and wanted the drink as a remedy.  It was admitted Miss O’Dwyer’s Hotel was well conducted. The cases were withdrawn. Fines of 20/- were inflicted in two cases for none vaccination.

2 Feb 1922 –  Kilmore Court of Petty Sessions

Randolph Blair Forbes, licensee of the Woodman’s Arms Hotel, Wallan appeared for failing to have bar locked during prohibited hours, was fined £5, and £3/4/6 costs. 

Randolph Blair Forbes died 3/10/1923 aged 35, leaving a widow Doris and 4 children in Ralph, Pauline, Patricia and Barbara.

Edmund O’Dwyer- killed in horse and gig accident (New Years Eve 1923)

31 Dec 1923 (New Years Eve) Edmund O’Dwyer formerly of  Big Hill and O’Dwyers Hotel, Wallan Wallan, (latterly of Boosey, NSW)  was returning home on his gig along the Tungamah-Burramine Rd, with another gig following was following behind closely.

On passing a contractors camp about five miles out from Tungamah, a  dog ran out from a tent, which frightened the horse of the following gig, which then ran into and capsized Mr O’Dwyer’s gig, and his neck was dislocated by the violence of the resultant fall, and he was killed instantly, aged  53 (North Eastern Ensign, Benalla Fri 11 January 1924).

____________________________________

Woodmans Arms Hotel Fire (Feb 1926)

March 1926 – A verdict of accidental death  was returned by the Deputy Coroner after inquiring into the death of Rupert H Whitely who died in the Kilmore Hospital on 3 March from injuries received while he and another man were pouring petrol into a motor tank at the same time using a hurricane lamp for light.  The petrol ignited and the tin exploded setting fire to the Woodman Arms Hotel, Wallan (on 28 Feb).  Mrs G Burns the licensee, was complimented upon her prompt action in extinguishing the fire, and saving the building from destruction (The ARGUS 17 March 1926).

July 1927 a Stephen Buckland was working as a waiter at the Woodman Arms.

____________________________________

Tuesday 12 June 1927 – Kilmore Court of Petty Sessions

before Messrs. Hunt and McDougall JP

Wallan Baker was charged with driving a motor car whilst under the influence of alcohol.  Evidence was submitted that the defendant had damaged the verandah of the Woodman’s Arms Hotel at Wallan, and also a spring cart belonging to Arthur James O’Neill, who testified as to the damage and acknowledged having received £20 compensation for the vehicle, which he had purchased for £12. AT Cook (Secretary of the Broadmeadows Shire) gave evidence as to the defendants reputation, to who he bore an excellent character and that he had frequently seen him refuse drink where it was most abundant and had never seen him take a drink.  The defendant declared that he had never taken drink during his life until the day named and that he took three glasses of wine and that he remembers nothing further until he awoke at the Wallan police station.   He pleaded guilty and was fine £ 5 with £ 2/15/6d costs, and an order was made to remit his license to the Clerk of Courts, in default distress.

also on Tuesday 12 June 1927 – before the Kilmore Court of Petty Sessions

before Messrs. Hunt and McDougall JP

Inspector Salts V Leslie Murray – for supplying liquor to persons during prohibited hours on 20th February at the Woodman’s Arms Hotel, Wallan and for also allowing persons on the licensed premises during prohibited hours.

Arthur Bull (jnr), Charles Vallence and Jeremiah Vallence – were charged with being on licensed hotel, premises during prohibited hours. Mr Mulvey appeared for defendant and as the latter was not licensee the case was dismissed.

The three men were each fined 15/- with 5/- costs. 

Thursday  14 April 1932 – Kilmore Court of Petty Sessions

before Mr HR McDonald

Breaches of Licensing’ Act – Inspector Salts V Ellen Honora Murray, licensee of’ the Woodman’s Arms Hotel, Wallan, for supplying liquor during prohibited hours, for allowing’ persons on ‘the licensed premise during prohibited hours, and with not having the lodgers book properly entered up.

Arthur Bull (snr) was charged with being, on the licensed premises during prohibited hours. 

 Inspector Jones appeared for the M Mulvey for defendant.

The four cases were then taken together –

First Constable. Dunk said-  that on Saturday 16 March, in company with Plain clothes Constable Smedley  he visited the Woodman’s Arms Hotel, Wallan at 11.35 am.  That he saw a man carrying a vessel to a car, also a woman. carrying a pint pot in which there were fresh dregs of’ beer.  Went into the hotel and found Bert Murray standing at the lodger cupboard. Asked Murray if he served beer to the woman and, be said no. The woman said she took a pint of’ beer to as friend in the bar.  Alongside the cupboard was Bull. Asked him what he was doing on the premises and he said he was there to clean up the place.   Two glasses were there and Murray and Bull drank beer from them.  Bull was entered in the lodger’s book as occupying room No. 6.  Bull said her did not stay at the hotel and did not engage the room.  Murray said he put Bull’s name in the book because he, thought Bull was going to stay there for the night.  ‘The word Wallan was not opposite Bulls name in the lodgers book when I signed it’. 

To Mr Mulvey – The names in the book appeared to be in the same handwriting.  Entered through the room where the pianola is.  Bull had his hat on and be may have said good morning  to me.  I was not concerned about him at that time, but later on when I asked him what he was doing on, the premises and he said he was engaged clean up.

Plain clothes Constable Smedley told me that Bell occasionally worked at the hotel.  Mrs Murray told me she had been in the hotel for about six months.  Do not know if she held the license for fourteen months or if ‘she held a license previously.

Plain clothes Constable Smedley corroborated for the defence – Arthur Bull deposed on 6th Marah at 11.30am I was doing some cleaning up at Murray’s Hotel, Had just finished the cupboard and two parlours when Constable Dunk came in and asked what my name was doing in the lodgers book . Work at ‘the hotel every Wednesday and on Sunday after a cricket or football team has been there, Bert Murray asked me to give him a hand. I used a mop and the floors were not quite dry when Constable Dunk arrived.  He asked me what is was doing there and I told him I did the cleaning’ up. Bert Murray shouted when I started and again, when I finished, I drank half the second , glass of beer and Constable Dunk came and asked me what my name was doing in the lodgers book and I told him I worked there when wanted and sometimes had dinner but  never stopped there at night .

I Albert Clarence’ Murray deposed – Was in charge of the place on 6 March when the police came into the room, The licensee and her husband, were not about.  The entries in the lodgers book are in my hand writing.  Considered it my duty to enter up the book and entered Bull’s name as being employed at the hotel.

To Inspector Jones – – The word Wallan was in the lodgers book opposite Ball’s name when Constable Dunk signed it. Do not often write up the lodgers book.  Had to put bull’s name in the book as he was an employee.  

Inspector Jones – Are you sure the word Wallan was opposite Bull’s name when the police signed the book. 

Witness – Yes, certainly.

Inspector Jones – Do you say that the police are telling lies in their evidence !

Witness (hesitating) – Well, the word was there.

Leslie Murray, husband of’ licensee and Manager of the hotel, corroborated evidence concerning Bull’s employment.

Defendant was fined £2 on each charge with £1/11/ 6d costs. 

A stay of seven days was granted.

Mr McDonald said he could not regard Bull as an employee, lodger or traveller, and imposed a fine of 15/- and 5/- costs for being on the premises.

_____________________________

Arthur Bull, who came from Preston as a youth, and formerly a fruiter and green grocer in Wallan also occasionally worked at the Woodmans Arms Hotel.  He died on 13/3/1935 (68 yo) after not having in good health for some time.  He lived alone and on the night before, he complained that he did not feel very well – having not collected his mail ask usual Mr W O’Brien went to his house and found him dead. His wife  predeceased him and he left children (3 sons and 3 daughters).

The WOODMAN’S ARMS Hotel

destroyed by fire 21 August 1935


WOODMANS ARMS DESTROYED BY FIRE 21 AUGUST 1935
per KFP 22 August 1935

NEW HOTEL FOR WALLANTransfer of Other Licenses

Plans for the rebuilding of the Woodman’s Arms Hotel were approved by the Licensing Court on 9 November 1935.  It was anticipated that the new Hotel would be completed in five months.  The total estimated cost was anticipated at over £3500.

Nearly 18 months later and the end of March 1937  it was reported that work was still not quite complete on the new premises, and that the popular host and hostess (Mr & Mrs T Burn) were busy arranging elaborate furnishings.  Also that in addition to all the modern fittings the building was to be lit by electricity generated by a powerful plant close by a powerful plant close by, and that a modern sewerage system had been installed. 

After disposing of the Wallan Hotel, Mrs Burns purchased the Batesford Hotel on the main Geelong to Ballarat Rd and subsequently let it on lease. Mr & Mrs Burns then returned to Wallan to live in retirement. However by the end of 1938 Mr Burns had purchased the Lara Hotel and they decided to take possession immediately.

By January 1938 Edward Benjamin was the proprietor, and all the modern improvements has attracted extra patronage by the travelling public to the inn.

________________________________

KFP Thursday 20 January 1938
WALLAN HOTEL (opened 1937)

JUST WHO WAS MADAME LOYER-NILSSON ?

26 August 1940 in  the ‘Fighting Forces Road’ cycling road race from Melbourne to Puckapunyal Madame Loyer-Nilsson of the Wallan Hotel donated 1 guinea (= 21 shillings) to go towards the trophies that were being raced for.

(per to JW Payne, Pretty Sally’s Hill 1981) Madame Loyer-Nilsson was of french extraction, and she was one time the licensee of the Wallan Hotel. Apparently in her time of occupation there, the walls of the bar and lounge were hung cartoons of a Gallic flavour, giving a piquancy to several situations. Two of the cartoons were known to have survived into at least the 1980s (and possibly beyond). One cartoon showing an unfortunate mesalliance between the poodle of a rich woman and an alley cur. The other cartoon showed a small boy urinating into a pool to the dismay of the pool’s inhabitants. Indignant frogs are clambering up the bank and fish and insect life are swimming from the point of pollution. The cartoon’s caption Ne buvez jamels l’eau could well be taken as a motto for Wallan in its early days………………………………

HOWEVER – per this research however Madame Loyer-Nilsson was born Freda Louis Benjamin in Hanover, Germany sometime around 1887c.

On 12 Sept 1916 she married Arthur Emilio Felix Loyer (born 1873c in Trujillo, Peru, South America) in Tasmania (Church of England).

Freda and Arthur managed a hotel at 154 Spencer St, Melbourne for several years (hotel name unknown per this research).

Yoshino Maru Scan10001.jpg
SS Yoshino Maru Launched as the ‘Kliest’ in 1907
Germany was ceded the ship to the United Kingdom in 1919
In 1921 she in turn was sold to Japan two years later and renamed SS Yoshino Maru, and was used as a mail ship of the NYK Line
In 1929 she was sold to Kinkai Yusen for use as a ocean liner.
The Imperial Japanese Navy in WW2 for use as a transport ship
On 31 July 1944 when traveling in convey with 5063 soldiers onboard she was attacked by the US Navy Submarine Wolfpack
The USS (SS-384) torpedoed the ship (with 4 torpedoes hits) and some 2442 soldiers , 18 gunners and 35 crew were lost

Freda returned from an asian overseas trip when on 7 Aug 1922 she travelled 1st Class onboard SS Yosheno Maru from Kobe, Japan bound for Sydney – at this time she stated that she was English (not Australian).

On 23 Oct 1929 Arthur filed a petition for divorce as he claimed he has been deserted from his wife for 3 years. From the petition is can be established that Arthur was indeed very wealthy businessman, his wife according to his petition eludes that she was ‘carefree’ with how she sent money and on a regular basis. Arthur had first arrived in Australia at the age of 9.

Freda returned from an overseas trip when on 7 Aug 1922 she travelled 1st Class onboard SS Yoshino Maru from Kobe, Japan bound for Sydney – at this time she stated that she was English (not Australian).

M/S Yngaren
Launched in 1921 a Swedish merchant ship
On 12 Jan 1942 unescorted she was sunk by U43 by 2 torpedoes
Only 2 survivors from 40 onboard (lost were the Master, 31 crew and 6 passengers)

It is from the period 1938-1940 that we find that Freda has added a prefix to her name in ‘Madame’.

StateLibQld 1 141855 Melbourne Star (ship).jpg
MV Melboune Star
Launched in 1936, she was converted in WW2
Played a distinguished role in ‘Operation Pedestal’ – providing relief during the siege of Malta.
She was sunk by torpedo in 1943 with the loss of 115 lives

As the ‘dark clouds were settling over Europe’ on 22 March 1939 we again find Freda returning home from yet another oversesa trip. Boarding the ‘MV Melbourne Star’ and travelling 1st Class from London, England, she on this occasion records her country of citizenship as that of Sweden, though she detailed that she lived in Australia.

From Jan 1940 and only a little over three months after Germany invaded Poland the local press (KFP) recorded that Madame Loyer-Nilsson the charming hostess (per KFP) who had taken a prominent part in planning the many alterations and improvements to the ‘new’ Wallan Hotel. – had left by air for a tour of the Continent, and planned to return to Australia via America. This was her fourth ‘world tour’ that she had undertaken.

Regarding Freda’s regular trips overseas and the timing of the last trip during the early months of WW2, could possibly raise questions as to exactly why a person of Germans origin was travelling to Europe ?

Arthur Emilio Felix Loyer passed away on 1 Jan 1950 at South Yarra – his occupation at that time was recorded as ‘investor’.

Freda passed away in 10 November 1959 (Nepean Hwy), Melbourne, aged 76.

_________________________________

WALLAN HOTEL

17 August 1945 Ellen Honora Murray passed away at 3 Michael St, West Brunswick (at home) aged only 39.

                                                       ____________________

BEER SHOP  (1866c-1873)

MACS HOTEL / (1874-1875) 

MACS/McDONALDS HOTEL  (1876c-1888)

CAMPBELLS HOTEL(1888c)

MACS/MACKS HOTEL (1889c- 1904)

KEAMS & TOWER HOTEL/ GRAND HOTEL/ JACKSONS HOTEL (1905-1916)

– all the above premises (three of) were located on the site of the present day Laffan Bros.Garage.

1888 – timber building of 12 rooms

PremisesLicensee
&
Owner
Earliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
LandNett
Value
£
Beer ShopKenneth
McDonald
(store & beer
shopkeeper)
Sept
1866
  12
  ditto Kenneth
McDonald
(beer shop)
Sept
1867
Sept
1868
 12
poss. store
& beershop
Kenneth
McDonald
Sept
1868
1871  
poss. store
& beer shop
 
Robert
McDonald
1872  25
poss. store
& beershop
Kenneth
McDonald
& poss.
Robert
McDonald
(see above)
Sept
1872
187312
acres
15
possibly store
& beer shop
Kenneth
McDonald
1873 12
acres
23
Macs HotelLicensee –
Kenneth
McDonald

Owner – William
John Walsh
(from Melb.)
18749
May
1875
72
acres
35
 dittoLicensee –
Sarah
McDonald
– widow

Owner – William
John Walsh
10
May
1875
Nov
1877
25
acres
35
McDonalds
Hotel
Licensee –
Sarah
McDonald

Owner – William
John Walsh
Nov
1877
Nov
1877
  
  ditto Licensee –
Sarah
McDonald

Owner – William
John Walsh
Nov
1877
1878&
land
27
  ditto Licensee –

Owner -William
John Walsh
(from Melb.)
Sept
1880
Sept
1882
2.5
acres
34
  ditto Licensee –
Michael Henry
Nolan

Owner – William
John Walsh
Sept
1883
 2.5
acres
34
  ditto Licensee – Mrs
Sarah Coghill

Owner – William
John Walsh
Jan
1884
Dec
1884
  
  ditto Licensee/s –
Mrs Sarah
Coghill
&
Margaret
Coghill

Owner – William
John Walsh
Dec
1884
Sept
1886
  
Unknown
Jan 1886 to
Dec 1887
Licensee – Mrs
Sarah Coghill

Owner – William
John Walsh
Sept
1886
Nov
1887
(insol-
vent)
  
Macs Hotel

DESTROYED
BY FIRE (1888)
Licensee – Mrs
Emma Rice

Owner – William
John Walsh
188818882.5
acres
34
Campbell’s
Hotel ? *
             ?    ?   ? 
commence-
ment of the
premises
being rebuilt
was not until
1889
Licensee – John
Webster
(victualler for
Mack’s)

Owner – William
John Walsh
1888
1889
2.5
acres
34
Mack’s HotelLicensee – Mrs
Emma Rice

Owner – William
John Walsh
Mar
1889
Mar
1890
  
see Court case
of 13 August
1890 regarding
the building of
a new hotel 
Macs HotelLicensee – Mrs Catherine
O’Connor

Owner – William
John Walsh
 Mar
1890
1895  
(still being
rebuilt in
1890)
Licensee –
Thomas Page

Owner – William
John Walsh
Sept
1893
1894 30
 Macs Hotel Licensee – Mrs
Mary Catherine
Page (evicted)

Owner – William
John Walsh
Oct
1893
Pre
July
1894
  
 dittoLicensee –
Kate & James
O’Farrell
(special license
granted)

Owner – William
John Walsh
July
1894
1895  
 dittoLicensee –
James O’Farrell

Owner –
Commercial Bank
Sept
1895
Sept
1895
3.5
acres
 
Purportedly –
DESTROYED
BY FIRE
(1895)
This  may
account
for the
Commercial
Bank of
Australasia
having an
interest in
the property ?
Licensee –
Kate O’Farrell

Owner –
Commercial Bank
 27
Feb
1896
  
Mack’sLicensee –
John Stewart
(appointed by
Bank – and
granted a 5
year lease)-
he had prev.
held Hotel
Licenses


Owner –
Commercial Bank
from
28
Feb
1896
3.5 acres35
 dittoJohn Stewart Oct
1899+
 30
  ditto Mrs O’Connor

Owner – William
John Walsh
18986
Oct
1899
 30
  ditto John Hayes7
Oct
1899
Sept
1901
 35
Macs HotelMary StewartSept
1901
   
MacksMrs Sweetman 22
May
1902
  
  ditto George Ambrose
Dowie
 5
June
1903
  
  ditto Amelia ‘Millie’
Francis Dowie
(wife of above)
May
1902
1904  
DESTROYED
BY FIRE
(1905c)
Martha Irving
Phillips
19041904+  
Tower HotelOwner – John
(Jack) W Keam
Aug
1905
   
(also recorded
as on the site
of ‘the
Colonial License
& Billiard Hotel
(?)
(previous had
been a licensee
on and off ‘
since 1890c
in Bendigo &
Western Aust-
ralia)
    
Keams Tower
Hotel
Owner –
(Jack) W Keam
1907Sept
1908
  30
Tower HotelE Jackson,
David Treegon
(licensees)

Owner – John
(Jack) W Keam
bef.
June
1909
   
Grand
Hotel **
(for a short
period ?)
Licensee –
David Treegon

Owner – John
(Jack) W Keam
1909Oct
1909
  
Tower Hotel Feb
1910
Sept
1910
  
Jacksons
Tower Hotel
Licensee –
E Jackson ?

Owner – John
(Jack) W Keam
June
1910
Sept
1911
  45
Tower HotelOwner – John
(Jack) W Keam
    
  ditto Owner – John
(Jack) W Keam
 Sept
1912
 45
  ditto Mrs  Keam

Owner – John
(Jack) W Keam
 Dec 191331
Mar 1914
 45
  ditto David Dunlop Lea

Owner – John
(Jack) W Keam
1
April
1914
bef.
May
1914
  
  ditto Licensee –
P Hempill

Owner – John
(Jack) W Keam
bef.
May
1914
Sept
1914
 45
  ditto Licensee –
P Hempill

Owner – John
(Jack) W Keam
Sept
1914
Oct
1915
 52
Tower HotelDavid Dunlop Lea

Owner – John
(Jack) W Keam
Oct
1915
Feb
1916
  
  ditto Licensee – Charles
Richard Hunt
(previously of
Laanacoorie)

Owner – John
(Jack) W Keam
Feb
1916
Dec
1916
  
DELICENSED
31 Dec 1916
(became a rest
and nursing
home)
     
Building was –
DESTROYED
BY FIRE 
14 June 1926
(when the
property was
then owned
by Donald
Rae)      
     
* Little if anything can be found regarding a Campbell Hotel at Wallan Wallan (1888), alas his/her stay was short
(in the summer of 1887/88 a J Campbell was the captain of the local Wallan Wallan cricket team)
** single reference to Grand Hotel

FATAL ACCIDENT

Sunday morning 9 May 1875

Kenneth McDonald (Hotel & Storekeeper), about 70 years of age, of  Mac‘s Hotel at Wallan Wallan, met his death when riding down Big Hill within four  miles of his house.  He had earlier ridden in the direction of Kilmore to join the procession of the funeral of the late Mrs John Flynn, near the Union Hotel.  When heading south he only proceeded only about two miles when he appeared to slump and at the same time grabbed the nape of his horse as he then lowly fell from his mount.  He sustained a fractured neck and skull, and never spoke afterwards (possibly unconscious ?) and passed away only a few minutes later. 

Nov 1877 Sarah McDonald – offered a 4 roomed dwelling/house offered for sale.

Nov 1887 due to sickness and death Mrs Sarah Coghill became insolvent with debts totalling £67 in running the Hotel.

In 1888 the premises burnt down and were rebuilt, with work not commencing until 1889. The hotel appears to have opened as Campbells Hotel (of 12 rooms) in 1890 – this was the 2nd building on site.- as detailed above little to nothing further is known regarding Campbell name – likely being the licensee.

SERIOUS CHARGE AGAINST A COMMERCIAL TRAVELLER

Mac’s Hotel- Shooting Outside Mac’s Hotel

(licensee’s husband charged with attempted murder)

On 26 November 1888 Edward Joseph Patrick Rice (draper and commercial traveller) of Melbourne, and recorded as a respectable looking man of about 50 years of age, the husband of Emma Rice the licensee of Mac’s Hotel, Wallan Wallan shot a George William Burnett with a revolver outside the Hotel.  Three shots were fired, the first two shots aimed at his head  missed, whilst the third shot struck the victim in the side and inflicted dangerous abdominal wound. 

The deed was brought on by a fit of jealousy, and Rice was arrested shortly afterwards and lodged in the Kilmore Gaol on the charge of attempted murder.  On being searched Rice was found to have had 89 rounds of ammunition on him.

Edward Rice had paid an unexpected visit see his wife at the hotel on 26 November, suspecting the conduct of his wife with BurnettMrs Rice picked her husband up at the Wallan East railway station and drove him to the hotel, where Burnett and his mother were staying.  Upon their arrival at the hotel Burnett who was in a muddled state came out and spoke to the prisoner and appeared to want to shake hands, however Rice refused, declining to have anything to do with him, and said ‘I am going to shoot you’.  Burnett thinking that he was joking said ‘shoot away’,  whereupon Rice drew a revolver and fired three shots.  The first two shots were aimed at Burnett’s head and they missed, and Burnett stepped forward again endeavouring to grasp the revolver when the third shot was fired. Burnett however despite being wounded closed in on Rice and threw him to the ground.  With Burnett’s mother who had by now also come outside the hotel came to her sons assistance and she wretched the revolver from Rice’s hand.

Rice was subdued and then tied up, before being taken to the police station, where he said that he was ‘sorry that he did not shoot his wife as well’.  He further stated that Burnett was guilty of immoral conduct with his wife’ and that he ‘‘was driven to commit the crime’. After a hearing at the Kilmore Court, Rice was committed to stand trial at the Supreme Court in Melbourne.  The case was to be heard the following February, and Rice was granted bail in one surety of  £200 and two of £120.

The defence for Rice was to the effect that the prisoner had acted under the effects of great excitement, caused by jealousy and the fear of Burnett. When confronted by Burnettooutside Mac’s Hotel he thought Burnett was going to assault him again, so the prisoner shot him during his excitement of self -defence.  The prisoner said that Burnett had been curse to him for year, and was encouraged by his (the prisoners) wife.

Edward and his wife Emma Rice had previously kept tea gardens in Hawthorn, and it was here that Mrs Rice and Burnett had first became acquainted.  Burnett back in 1884 had lived at the Hawthorn tea gardens with a Mr and Mrs Rice, where he was employed by them to attend to the gardens and other work.  In March of 1884, Rice had obtained a warrant for the arrest of Burnett\ for threatening his life, but the charge was dismissed by the Magistrates.  Burnett had also previously stayed at the Mac’s Hotel, and the prisoner had complained to Burnett about his presence at the hotel, and he had ordered him to leave, but Burnett had assaulted him.  At the time of the shooting Burnett was residing  with Mrs Rice at her Mac’s Hotel whilst her husband was away working.  Police reports detail that Rice had again complained to the police that Burnett would do him bodily harm, and stated that he was scared of him.  In addition he knew Burnett kept firearms that he was still  on terms of undue intimacy with his wife. 

Two witnesses who had worked with the prisoner previously at the Equitable Store, Melbourne gave evidence that Rice was eccentric in his behaviour, and that before he was discharged from his employment there he was labouring under great excitement and brooding over his affairs. 

The jury found Rice guilty on the second count intent to do Burnett grievous bodily harm, but recommended him to mercy on the grounds that he had been badly treated and received provocation.  Then brought up for sentence and his Honour said ‘that it was plain Rice had deliberately fired at Burnett, and there had been no immediate provocation.  It could not be tolerated that anyone could go out and shoot any person be had a grudge against or was jealous of’.  Rice was then sentenced to 3 years gaol, with the first week of the 1st, 6th, 12th, 18th and 24 months in solitary confinement’.

Burnett was later married to a widow residing at Anakie, but continued to visit Mrs Rice at Wallan Wallan though her tenure at the Mac’s Hotel was not to last for much longer at the premises were burnt to the ground later in the same yea..

Then in 1890 –

On 25April 1890 having left Wallan Wallan, Mrs Emma Rice applied at the Castlemaine Licensing Court for of the transfer of the license of the Railway Hotel, at Campbells Creek (nr Castlemaine) from Hugh Fagan.  It was asked if Mrs Rice if she had previously held a licence, and she said she had held one for Mac’s Hotel, Wallan Wallan, which was burned down.  She detailed that her husband was in gaol for shooting a man named Burnett, who had stayed at her hotel there.  After the shooting, Burnett continued to stay at the hotel, and she further stated that she was on friendly relations between her husband and Burnett.  Furthermore she added that the Constable (presumably the policeman stationed at Wallan Wallan) had presented a telegram from her husband, directing the Constable to turn Burnett away from the premises – the shooting did not take place for three months after this.  Burnett had passed as her husband and her husband had received injuries in the head, and when he took a glass of beer he was not responsible for what he did.  Mrs Rice said she believed the she and Burnett were not separated, and that he had visited her only the previous week at Fagan’s Railway Hotel where they occupied the same room with Burnett.  She stated that she was 61 years old and that she came to the Colony in 1879  – and that Burnett was an adopted son of her father’s, and had lived for many years as one of the family………… The shooting was in 1888 and the license was renewed to her after that. She always looked upon Burnett as her brother. Being liable too she required someone in the room with her, did she pass Burnett as her husband ?   The police made no complaint about the manner in which she conducted her house at Wallan.

Mrs Rice handed to the Bench several letters she had as to character.  She thought her husband, either through jealousy or drink, shot Burnett, some 17 months ago and that her husband had many eccentricities, and through them had been discharged from George and George’s.  There never had been anything wrong with her and Burnett.  She had purchased the Railway Hotel for £350, and intended on keeping the hotel herself and not having Burnett staying there.  She had invested her all in the hotel.

The resent licensee Hugh Fagan of the Mount Alexander Examiner recorded that  Mrs Rice and a gentleman came for accommodation which they obtained, believing them to be husband and wife. They had two rooms, a bedroom and one adjoining with a sofa in it.  They behaved themselves very properly, not showing much affection. When he told them that as they were not married they couId not stay in his house together, they left.  Constable Perallo(?) stated that Mrs Rice had conducted the house at Wallan Wallan very well but there was no business doing in it. When he showed her the telegram from her husband, she remarked that she thought her husband was displeased at Burnett drinking so much. Rice had apparently been after a heavy spree, when, he shot Burnett.  He had heard of Mrs Rice fainting, but did not know of her having disease of the heart.  It was dwelled upon the circumstance that there had not been any complaints against Mrs Rice when holding a license at Wallan Wallan.  

It was determined that as four months of the year had elapsed, and at the application for renewals next year, the Court would then have an opportunity of judging how the house was actually conducted.  It was remarked that when licences were granted, it was hard to refuse a license. He did not like to refuse the transfer to a woman of Mrs Rice’s age, when she had put her all into the hotel – he said that he would grant the transfer he must warn her not to have Burnett in her hotel.  Mrs Rice concluded with ‘ there had never been a stain on her character’.

Mrs Rice tenure at the Railway Hotel Campbells Creek was very short as in November 1890 an Ernest Atkins applied for the transfer of the license of the hotel from Mrs Emma Rice.  Being no objection on the part of the police the transfer was granted.

This was not to be last we hear of George William Burnett as fast forwarding to four years later –

Tragedy at West Geelong – on 3 January 1894 the same (a militiaman) shot a youth by the name of Walter John Jose in Wellington St, West Geelong.

He was the only support for his mother, who had tried to get him to return home before the shooting.  He was muddled with drink at the time and was said to be suffering from the effects of sunstroke.

At the time of the shooting Burnett  whilst under the influence of drink, had an alternation with several lads including the deceased, near the Bay View Hotel in West Geelong.  He had become so much annoyed at being splashed with water from a trough that he went into his house and brought out a Martini-Henry rifle, with which he followed the boys through several streets.  He took aim at them on four different occasions and finally be took a shot at the deceased and another boy, who were standing at a corner some 240 yards away.  Jose fell mortally wounded with a perforated liver, and he passed away about twelve hours later at Geelong West.  It later transpiring that the ‘ball’ struck the footpath before is ricocheted, and that after it passed through Jose the ‘ball’ sped along for a couple of hundred yards further, when its course was stopped by a gate post.  Several by-standers in the street had a very narrow escape’.  The deceased was described as of a wayward disposition, and that it was only three months since he had been stabbed in the arm during a quarrel with some other youths.

Arrested, he was brought up before the Police court the following morning on the charge of wilful murder and was remanded to appear at the Coroner Court to be held at the hospital the following day. 

The prisoner was recorded as a native of Manchester, England, some 42 years of age and that he arrived in Victoria some ten years previous.  His trade was a plate glass manufacturer, whilst his character was recorded that of an idler addicted to drink, from the effects of which he often suffered.

At the conclusion of the subsequent murder trial the jury after a retirement of three hours, found the prisoner guilty of murder, with a strong recommendation to for mercy, which His Honour said he would endorse in reporting to the Executive.  In his report to the Cabinet His Honour recommended leniency, not so much on account of the degree of provocation received by the prisoner as for the reason that juries would probably be adverse to convicting on the capital charge if their recommendation be made on rational grounds were disregarded. He also pointed. out that in his summing the probability of the death sentence being commuted if the prisoner be found guilty, and he thought that that verdict would not have been found had the jury thought execution would follow.

The sentence of death was passed and at the later hearing of The Cabinet and Executive (Governor) Council on 20 February 1894, his death sentence was commuted to 15 years imprisonment.

_______________________________

13 August 1890 at the Kilmore County Court

Thomas Gibbs St. Clair ‘vs’  William John Walsh

for £49/19/- for work and labour done

(regarding the building of a new Hotel in Wallan Wallan)

The plaintiff (St. Clair) had consequence to preliminary arrangements with a nephew of the defendant (Walsh), gone to Wallan Wallan on 13 March 1890 and interviewed Mr Walsh regarding superintending the building of a hotel in the townshipWalsh had shown him the plans and specifications and asked him to take charge of the job.  The plaintiff had asked for £4 a week.  The defendant told him to take the plans to Melbourne and to ‘take out the quantities’ which he duly did.  Upon returning to Wallan Wallan on 25 March Walsh gave St. Clair the permission to employ men.

St Clair introduced Walsh to a man named James Taylor and asked if he would let the contract.  Walsh would not make arrangements with Taylor, as he had already made arrangements with wto men from Melbourne to come and work on the contract.  St. Clair then wrote to Walsh asking him when he would commence the work, and received a reply to the effect that the Walsh could not pay me 13/4d a day,  but that he would agree to let me work at the wage given to the other men he had employed. This he refused to do, and subsequently he had summoned the defendant for breach of a contract.

Cross Examined – ‘it is false that Mr Walsh said he would not employ me, but that I could take the plans and see if I could make anything of it ?’    I was out of work for 12 weeks on account of refusing other works owing to my arrangement with the defendant.

James Taylor, contractor deposed that he accompanied by the plaintiff visited Walsh and asked him if he ‘would let the erection of the building by contract’.  The defendant said ‘no, I have engaged this ma, I will do it myself.’

Alphonso Bye (?) and Henry Holmes deposed they were engaged by the plaintiff to do the work at Wallan Wallan on the 26th.

WJ Walsh deposed that he ‘had an interview with the plaintiff at Wallan Wallan’.  Plaintiff said that he ‘would go on at  £3 a week and would he let me know the quantities needed for the building.  No conversation about 13/6d a day ever took place’.

Cross Examined – ‘the whole thing is a complete swindle, I never authorised the plaintiff to engage men, did not see St. Clair

quantities but those given me where by a man named Dunn’.

S Dunn deposed that he was’ a carpenter a joiner and had made quantities himself’.

Mary O’Connor deposed that she was ‘a niece of Mr Walsh and that she had put in an advertisement in The Age for a man to go on with the work and Mr Walsh knew nothing about it’.

His Honour returned the verdict for £24 as damages by loss of time, with costs to be taxed.

______________________________

Dec 1891 Mrs O’Connor application for her license renewal as adjourned as the applicant was unable to find their license paperwork.

KFP Thursday 17 July 1894

3 August 1905 – Kilmore Police Court

before Mr E Williams PM

Constable Chenall V. Emma Fribey

Emma Fribey appeared accused of stealing a clock valued at 3/- from Harry West of the Tower Hotel, Wallan on 2Augus. The accused was found guilty and sentenced to 7 day’s imprisonment.

______________________________

Purportedly in 1895 a 3rd building was built on the site after the Hotel caught fire and was totally destroyed.   However no record can be found in the press of the day to substantiate this.

28 March 1896 at the Kilmore licensing Court – the Commercial Bank of Australasia asked that John Stewart be appointed nominee for Mack’s Hotel – license granted.

Sept 1897 John Stewart (who had held license previously)  was appointed for a 5 year lease in lieu of Kate O’Farrell

DateHotel LicenseeOther Details
from
28 April 1884
Recreation Hotel
Heidelberg Rd
John
Stewart
License transferred from a James
Sharpe
(per the Fitzroy Licensing Court)
from
Feb 1892
Cosmopolitan Hotel
Bourke St
Melbourne
John
Stewart
pre Nov 1894
to May 1895
Recreation Hotel
170 Queens Parade
North Fitzroy
John
Stewart
licensee transferred to a William
Cutler

this John’s wife Ellen ‘Nellie’

passed away at the Recreation
Hotel on 21 Nov 1894 aged
only 39 (at this time John is
recorded as Captain John
Stewart ………!)

NB: here was a ships Captain
of Melbourne by this name
from sometime before 1881

formerly Captain of the
‘Cingalese’ in Sept 1883 he
commenced three months
probation employment as a
Chief Mate of the pilot
schooner ‘Kip’. He was
appointed the position
of Leadsman in the pilot
service.  Upon giving
satisfaction after 3
months he was appointed
as a Junior Pilot.
Per the reference to John Stewart having been a hotel licensee in the past
the above records have been located for a John Stewart being a hotel licensee pre 1897 – and may be one and the same person ?

____________________________

Thursday 17 February 1898 – Kilmore Police Court

 William Murphy was charged with imposing on Alexander Cameron at Wallan on 12th February by false representation. 

The accused pleaded guilty.

Alexander Cameron
deposed
I am a storekeeper at Wallan.  Remember 12th February.  Accused
came into the store and ordered certain goods, and told me they
were for Mr Stewart.  The goods were not for Mr Stewart.
John Stewart
deposed
I am a hotelkeeper at Wallan. Had prisoner in my employ up until
12th February. I discharged him that night.
William Murphy
(Accused)
 I discharged myself.
 WitnessI did not give accused authority to order goods.  Whenever I got
him to get tools I gave him money to pay for them.  Accused was
partly the worse for wear on the night of 12th February.  I found
him honest whilst in my employ
Constable Polmear
deposed
From information  received I went in search of accused and
found him at the back of O’Dwyers Hotel with the goods in his
possession.  He said he would not have taken them only he was
drunk.  Afterwards he admitted he did it for spite.
  
 VERDICT Guilty
 SENTENCEWilliam Murphy (prisoner) was sentenced to 14 days in Melb-
ourne Gaol, with Costs of 19/2d 

8 July 1898 at the Kilmore Agricultural Ploughing match, Mr Stewart of Macs Hotel, Wallan Wallan had the liquor booth, and vendered good brandy  – ‘must have received a fair share of patronage’.

Oct 1899 transfer of license from John Stewart to Mary Stewart. 

Late 1899 a license application from _ Campbell was withdrawn on advise of a Solicitor (same surname per earlier ref. in 1888/1889)

Sept 1901 Licensee John Hayes was evicted.

5 June 1903 the premature death of the Licensee George Ambrose Dowie who was still young – he had only recently settled from Tasmania.

The Argus Monday 8 June 1903

23 June 1903 transfer of license to Martha Irving Phillips (late of Toora).

The Tower Hotel was recorded as the largest building in Wallan.

TOWER HOTEL, WALLAN WALLAN (1905-1916)

John (Jack) W KEAM

an ‘interesting’ working life

John (Jack) W Keam had previously conducted(?) a hotel in Queens St, Melbourne for  6 months, and another in Western Australia for 2 yrs, where he and Janet Beechmore had received bankruptcy orders of their establishment in Menzies, Perth.  He returned to the trade in 1898 and had also been a licensee in Bendigo before coming to Wallan Wallan.

He Nov 1891 at the Bendigo Quarterly Licencing Court John Keam a brewer’s traveller, applied for the transfer of the Globe Hotel, Mitchell St, Bendigo from Thos. Dean to himself.  Mr Cohen appeared in support of the application, and stated that he had been requested by the senior constable to ask the applicant if he were going to hold the license on behalf of a brewer or anyone else.  Mr Dean got into the witness box, and stated that he did not intend to hold the license for anyone else.  Senior constable Barry informed the court that under the circumstances the police did not oppose the application which was then granted.  Mr Hyett, on behalf of Mr R Williamson, the owner of the property, applied for permission to change the name of the hotel from the ‘Globe’ to ‘Hopetoun’.  The old hotel had been destroyed by fire, and in its place on the same site Mr Williamson had erected a commodious and handsome building – the application was granted. (per Bendigo Advertiser, Thurs 12 Nov 1891).

Hopetoun Hotel, Mitchell St, Bendigo
(credit – Supayou Productions)

Messrs GF Hunter and Sons, brewers, successfully tendered for the leasing of the new Hopetoun Hotel.

18 Mar 1891 the former Globe Hotel had been destroyed in an early morning (3.15am) destructive fire when a block of buildings in Mitchell St (on the corner near Wills St) that were all owned by Mr R Williamson.  Aside from the Globe Hotel being destroyed the fire also claimed R. Benson’s upholstering shop, W Code’s paper hanging establishment and Mrs Hewitt’s greengrocery store. The remnants of the buildings were still burning furiously at dawn.  The fire had originated in the Globe Hotel were a lamp had been left burning in a bedroom.  A child had been unwell and the licensee got up to attend to her, and on turning the lamp up it exploded, and the flames from the scattered kerosene quickly spread all over the room. (per Bendigo Advertiser).

Western Australian Goldfields Courier (Coolgardie) Saturday 14 November 1896
The Western Australian Goldfields Courier
Saturday 7 November 1896
The Menzies Miner (WA)
Friday 11 December 1896
Miners’ Daily News (Menzies, WA) Thursday 7 October 1897

1899 Advertisements with reference to ‘Businesses and Partnerships’ – likely referring to hotel Brokerage or similar. Carlton’s Agency, Royal Hotel Building, 140 Queen St, Melbourne – Liberal assistance, buyers and seller should call –  John Keam, Manager.

The Argus Friday 24 June 1904
The Age, Friday 24 June 1904
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-77.png
The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 – 1954), Thursday 5 November 1908
The Age Fri 6 November 1908

In October 1909 the Members of the Licenses Reduction Board, yesterday completed the hearing of claims for Compensation with respect to five hotels in the Broadmeadows licensing district which are to be closed at the end of the year. These comprised of the –

Council Club Hotel, Epping owner John Keam and licensee Mrs Annie Marshall

Franklin Hotel, Broadmeadows, AH. Birch licensee William Slocomb

Harvest Home Hotel, Wollert, owner Mary Griffin and the licensee Mrs Margaret O’Connor

Inverlochy Castle Hotel, Wallan, owner and licensee JF Laffan

Wheelmen’s Rest Hotel, Kal kallo, owner and licensee Mrs Margaret Lundy

The decisions were reserved in each case, and will be given early in November. It was announced by the board that the compensation determination in respect to the Bourke (metropolitan) district will be given on Monday next.

The Age – Tuesday 19 July 1910
The Age – Tuesday 20 December 1910

In December 1912 the Licensing Reduction Board reserved its decision regarding the Coach and Horses Hotel in Mundy Street.  M. EW Kirby appeared for Mr. Charles Bullock, the owner, and Mr. F. Cohen for the licensee Mrs Elizabeth Keam.  Charles Bullock said the Hotel was held under lease by Cohn Bros. Victoria Brewery Co. Ltd. at an annual rental of ,£94/18/-  out of which he paid £2/8/- insurance. This lease expired on 15th March, 1915 and he had been offered £2 per week for the Hotel by two other brewery firms, but had not entertained the offers. John Francis Kelly, valuator, valued the property, licensed on a 15 year purchase capitalisation at £92/8/ per year (the rental received by Mr. Bullock) at £1389.  He considered £26 a year a fair rental for property if delicensed, and this, capitalised, made the value .£390. Alterations to the building; would not cost more than £25.  He valued the land at £159.  There were 11 rooms in the Hotel.  Elizabeth Keam deposed that she was granted the license on 26 November and that she paid the outgoing licensee £178/4/- for the ingoing of which the goodwill amounted to £140.  The decision was reserved.

Bendigo Advertiser Wednesday 3 April 1912

A brief summary of the working life of John (Jack) KEAM from 1891 through to the delicensing of the Tower Hotel, Wallan Wallan at the end of 1916 –

DatesPositionHotel / AddressDetails
from
Nov
1891
 Hopetoun HotelA brewers traveller, Keam took
over the license of the former
‘Globe Hotel’ which had been
destroyed by fire
for
6mths
in
1890s
Hotel
Broker
Queen St, Melb  
1894c
-1896
 St. Albans Hotel, Menzies,
Perth, WA with
Janet Beechmore
Bankruptcy orders
Nov
1896
  Embezzlement charges 
– case dismissed
May
1897
Hotel
Property
Broker &
Valuer
(in WA)
  
Oct
1897
  £4000 liabilities  both
declared bankrupt
1898   
Nov
1899
Hotel
Broker?
 Carlton’s Agency, Royal
Hotel Building at 140
Queen St, Melbourne
24
May
1904
Marriage to
Elizabeth Ann _________
June
1904
  at Bendigo – Nicholas
Keam threatened to
kill his brother John
(Jack) Keam
 ____
to
1907?
 Licensee at Bendigo 
Pre
Nov
1908
Hotel
Broker
 of the Sun Buildings, Bourke
St, Melbourne
Nov
1908
Owner
/Broker
 Court Case – alleged fraud-
ulent representation to the sale
of the Council Club Hotel,
Epping – per Albert Norman
a former well known actor and
his wife Letitia (Blanche Lewis)
– Not proven
1908
to
1916
 TOWER HOTEL,
WALLAN WALLAN
 
Oct
1909
 OwnerCouncil Club Hotel,
Epping
(Licensee – Mrs Annie
Marshall)
 
From
July
1910
to
Dec
1910
LicenseeCrown Hotel, cnr.
Queen & Lonsdale
St, Melb
 
July
1911
  Wife obtained a prohibition
which he ignored, as he
obtained drink at ‘her hotel’
by force
Pre
April
1912
  Detained at some point in
the Lunacy Ward Bendigo
Hospital
April
1912
Divorce
Court,
Bendigo
 by Elizabeth Ann Keam
against her husband John on
the grounds of drunkenness
and cruelty.  Stated that he
was drunk nearly all the time.
The respondent (husband)
failed to appear in Court
From
bef.
April
1912
 Coach and Horses
Hotel, Mundy St
(licensee –
Mrs Elizabeth
Ann Keam)
 
14  
Jan
1914
  John Keam. husband of the
licensee of the Tower Hotel,
Wallan, appeared at the Kil-
more Court with a broken
jaw as the complaintant in
a charge of unlawful assault
by a William Stockdale
May
1914
  per above Case being heard
in the Supreme Court in
which Keam, sought
£117/10/- damages.
Judgement was awarded in
favour of Keam with £10
being awarded
July
1916
  County Court –
re Keam exchanging the
Tower Hotel for a farm in
Yaark

August 1905 ref to Harry West of the Tower Hotel (was possibly a boarder ?).

Four rooms were set aside for Billiards tables & fanciers.

The Licensing Reduction Board sat in early June 1909 regarding the fact that there were 13 hotels above the statutory number in the Broadmeadows.  Keam’s Tower Hotel (one of two Wallan hotels brought before the Board) was almost identical to another in the township that was not summonsed. The Board had to make a decision between two hotels, but only requested evidence regarding one !  On this occasion the Tower Hotel satisfied the Board on this occasion and was not delicensed just yet.

After June 1909 E Jackson formerly of the Shire Arms Hotel at Beveridge was the new licensee David Dunlop Lea was formerly a Coach painter and trimmer in Benalla.

March 1913 -Owing to the generosity and good nature of two local residents (Messrs Keams of the Tower Hotel and Howard), took the scholars attending the local school on an enjoyable trip to the AIF encampment at Wallan East. A little after 4 o’clock, when all their tasks were finished for the day, motor omnibus conveyed them from the school to the rendezvous, and brought them back in time for tea. Seats were reserved for the teachers.

 A DIVIDED BENCH KILMORE

(The  Age – Thurs 15 January 1914)

Swathed in bandages, and with a broken jaw tied up in lint, John Keam. husband of the licensee of. the Tower Hotel, Wallan. Appeared at the Kilmore Court, before Mr R  Knight PM, and Mr Thos. Dykes, JP as complainant in a charge of unlawful assault by a strong young man, named William Stockdale*. A claim was also made for £50 damages for assault. The bench, however, could not agree, and both cases were adjourned for a week. NB : the outcome is not recorded per this research.

KFP Thurs 15 January 1914
Daily News (Perth, WA) Wednesday 20 May 1914

DOG INJURED

Labourer’s Costly Retaliation

(KFP Thursday 25 May 1914)

In the First Civil Court on 25 May 1914 John Keam, formerly of the Tower Hotel, Wallan Wallan (of Parkville West) was awarded £10 as compensation upon him by William Stockdale*, of Wallan Wallan (labourer), in retaliation for an injury by Keam to his dog.  The claim was made for £117/10/- by Keam as the result of an assault made upon his New Years Eve last, at the Tower Hotel.  The justice in putting the case to the jury, and said that while Keam had complained the assault had resulted in him in having permanent disfigurement to his face, as both his jaws were injured.  Stockdale pleaded in defence that Keam had injured his dog, and that he had acted in self-defence.  A man was entitled to defend himself or his property. 

The case was then held over to the Second Civil Court presided over he Justice Hodges and a jury. The plantiff’s case was that when he was going around the place before locking up, a dog growled at him. He picked up a firebeater, whereupon the defendant whom he had not seen, suddenly struck him two blows that knocked him down. After which the defendant caught him by the throat and shook him.

Stockdale said that Keam struck his dog and when he pushed Keam away, it was the plaintiff who caught him by the throat, and that he then struck the palntiff.

As a result of the’ fracas was that Keam’s jaw was broken. The jury had to decide whether Stockdale had not overstepped his rights in doing what he had done.  Judgement was entered for the damages awarded with costs. The Jury returned a verdict for the plaintiff (Keam) assessing damages at £10, and a verdict was entered for that amount with costs.

* possibly/likely the William Stockdale – a man of man of stocky build who was very good at sport ? He lived with his family at the former premises of the Prince of Wales Hotel from about 1910. The premises having been a store after it was delicensed for a number of years.  Stockdale had been one of the most talented and naturally skilful football (despite his large ‘frame’ ) players to have represented the Wallan Wallan football (‘the Maroons’) club over several seasons pre the Great War.  It was of little surprize that his talents reached the ‘ears’ of football teams in Melbourne – so much so that in 1914 he was selected and played two Senior football games for the Port Melbourne FC in the VFA.  He was injured early into the season, and soon afterward enlisted in the AIF. He was killed in action at Gallipoli – with two different versions being reported/recorded on his death.

The Age, Wednesday 19 July 1916

THE LAPSE OF LEA

PUBLICAN SUED FOR MAINTENANCE BY HIS WIFE

who Charges Him with Womanising Ways – An Order was made

from the Truth (Melbourne Edition) Saturday 19 September 1914

Serious allegations were made against his wife by David Dunlop Lea, the licensee of the Tower Hotel, Wallan, to the Prahran Court on Monday afternoon. Lea, who is well known in Benalla and the North Eastern district was defendant in a case in , which his wife Sarah, who resides at 35 Tivoli street. South Yarra, sued for maintenance for herself and child. Mrs Lea alleged that all her domestic unhappiness was caused by Lea’s penchant for other women.  Mr.Nigan appeared for Mrs Lea, and Mr. S Williams for defendant.’

The story told by the complainant was that she was married to Lea in December, 1896, and that she had given birth to four children. They lived happily enough together up to five years ago, when complainant contracted a serious disorder, which she attributed to her husband.

 Mr Nigan –   I understand there was another woman in the case.  There was
another woman I from the beginning of our married life.  What
particular woman do you take exception to, Mrs Tulk ?  
– We lived in her mother’s house in Benalla, and, were very
friendly until I found out that she was more of a friend to my
husband than to me. On one occasion when he was drinking
very heavily, he came into the room and threatened our lives
with a gun.  I had to pick up a naked baby and take shelter
with neighbours.  He treated me so badly that seven months’
ago I had to leave and make my own living.  My health is not
good, however, and I am now living with my mother, with my
14 mouths’ old baby.  In answer to other questions witness
said her husband now had he Tower Hotel in Wallan. On
August 14 she went to see him and asked him what he
intended to do for her.  She then ran into Mrs Tulk, who was
staying at the hotel.
Mr. Nigan –That was the woman who caused the trouble before? –  ‘Yes.
I said to her ‘you wicked woman what are you what are you
doing her?’ ‘She said that is my business’. I replied that it
would be my business later on.   Later on in the day she a
sked me if I was going into the dining room for dinner, and
I said, ‘I will have nothing to do with you Mrs Tulk you have
destroyed my life’.  ‘I then ordered her to go out of the
house, but she only tittered and walked away.  I spoke to my
husband who told me Mrs Tulk and a friend intended to buy
the hotel, but I did not believe’.
 Mr Nigan –What sort of hotel is it ?  – I don’t know much about hotels
it is a nice building, but it’s not well conducted, and it is all
hours before it is shut at night.
 Mr. S. Williams –With regard to this disorder you had, are you prepared to
have the case adjourned so that your husband can be med-
ically examined to prove that he never at any time suffered
from any disorder such as you allege?’ –  ‘Yes, if he can
prove it.
The Chairman
(Mr McKinnon JP) –
What has that to do with the case?
Mr S Williams –‘She is trying to show that she is a very innocent woman
and I want to show her in HER TRUE COLOURS’. 
Mr Embing JP –She is showing that she is a injured woman’.
Defendant, on oath said –That he had never had any disorder in his life but asserted
that his wife had.  He was willing to have her home with
him again.
Mr. Nigan –‘What did you pay to go into Tower Hotel’ ? -‘ £250 for
the goodwill’.  
‘Is Mrs Tulk up there now now ?’ ‘– Yes  
‘She is a married woman ?’— Yes  L
Living with her husband ?’
— Yes.
The Chairman
(Mr McKinnon JP) –
Said that an order would be made for l5/- per week for
the wife, and 7/6d for the child, with £2 costs. The defendant
was also ordered to find two sureties of £25 pounds in
default one month.

Prahran Court

(from the Malvern Standard on Saturday 19 September 1914 )

Sarah Lea charged her husband David Dunlop Lea with leaving her without adequate means of support.  The evidence showed that the parties formerly lived at Wallan Wallan, and there had been family disagreements. Then Bench made an order for the payment of 15/- per week towards the wife’s support and 7/6 per week for the child.  The Defendant was also ordered to pay £3/3/- costs, and to find sureties for the due fulfilment of the orders in both cases.

DIVORCE COURT

(from The Argus Wednesday 9 April 1919)

Inthe  Divorce Court on 8 April 1919 a claim was made by Sarah Lea of Findlay St, Frankston aged 47, for the dissolution the Marriage with David Dunlop Lea a coach trimmer and furniture dealer on the grounds of desertion.  The petitioner stated that theMarriage took place on 8 December 1896 and there were three children.  Owing to her husband’s cruelty she had been compelled to leave him in January 1911 and go and live with her parents,  He had refused to maintain her, and she had obtained orders from the Prahran Court against him for 15/- for herself and 7/6 for the maintenance of the youngest child back in September 1914.  The Respondent had enlisted for active service, and during his absence she had draw n an allotment of his pay.  On his return from the war he had paid the arrears of his maintenance orders.  A divorce was granted, with costs, petitioner to have the custody of the youngest child.

9 March 1916 – Kilmore Police Court

Inspector Nolan vs Bertram P Hemphill

 – for allowing persons on the licensed premises of the Tower Hotel, Wallan Wallan, during prohibited hours. Mr McNab appeared for the defendant.  Struck out, defendant not being in charge of the premises, as a transfer of the licence was pending.

Inspector Nolan v. John Keam for neglecting to admit the police to the Tower Hotel, Wallan Wallan, within reasonable time, Constable Anderson deposed – at about 11.58 p.m. on 20th January he went to the hotel and knocked loudly, and tried several doors Mr McNab appeared for defendant but could not gain admission.  Called out that the police wanted admission.  Saw two persons in the hotel and Mr Keam pulled a blind before my face.  It was five minutes past 12 when I was admitted.

To Inspector Nolan – Mr Keam introduced himself to me as the owner of the hotel and that he had never seen Mr Keam (despite being the owner) acting in any capacity at the hotel he is very seldom there.  Mr Keam was in charge when I went there. There was no other but the two men. There was a light in the bar when I went there.

The case was withdrawn – the defendant not being authorised by the licensee to act in any capacity, and he was  entertaining the men as owner of the hotel .

Thursday 16 March 1916 – KILMORE POLICE COURT

 (per the KFP Thursday 16 March 1916)

JP Nathan Swanton was charged with being: drank at Wallan on the 6th March. 

Constable  RS Anderson deposed – on, Monday I went to the Tower Hotel, Wallan and I saw the accused sitting there.   I asked him what about a horse and dray wandering about, and he said, it had. nothing to do with me.  The man was under the influence of drink.  The licencee came into the bar and I told him to give Swanton no more drink. The defendant. said  ‘I’ll have as much drink as I like’.  I advised him to go away to his work, and he repeated that he would ‘have as much drink’ as he liked, The hotelkeeper also advised the man to go to work.  He though would not go, so I locked him up.  I admitted him, to bail at l0 o’clock that night.

To Mr McNab, who appeared for the defendant – at about half-past two I refused to admit him to bail as he was not fit to go out. There is nothing in the suspicion that would not let him.  The licensee of the Hotel (Hunt)said the was so, sober the licensee of  the hotel (Hunt), was present. I told Hunt not to give the man more drink. Did not say to accused ‘I am the boss of Wallan’.  I said to him ‘if  you are going to come here and rule Wallan, I might as well be out of the township altogether.  The man could walk but he could not walk in a straight because he was drunk’. 

The defendant, who was duly sworn in deposed – ‘Never saw Hunt before the day mentioned, Smith and I had four drinks.  The Constable asked me asked whose horse and dray outside, and I said I did not known in was not mine. He arrested me, and. I I was brought before Mr. Dyke’s but not the Constable, l said that as I would not plead guilty, he would not let me off’.

Cross examined,- ‘I did not make a statement in Wallan,  I had five drinks not to my knowledge; four drinks were all I had. Hunt said to me not to give the Constable any cheek, that was outside the door.  You never said to me in the hotel that you were the

Constable at Wallan.  I did not say that I would go away, when I pleased.  I am a ships engineers, I never said to you, You______ well won’t- lock, me up.  I said this is the first time I was locked up, I said jokingly that I should have been locked up before many times when I was drunk.

Charles Richard Hunt (hotelkeeper) deposed – defendant was in my hotel on. Tuesday about noon. Served him with four drinks, three with a man named Smith, and one with John Smyth.  The man was perfectly sober, and the Constable said to me, don’t give the man any more drink’.  I swear the defendant -was perfectly sober.  That was about half  past two, I went down about five o’clock, to bail him out and the Constable said he would not let him out until  after six hours’.  

Cross-examined – ‘I never saw the accused before Monday, and I never said I was going to see this thing through on Tuesday, or said at any time to Mr Dykes and yourself. You said to me in the hallway not to give the man more drink.  I said to Stanton not to argue with the Constable.  The man did not use any bad language at all, and he did not say he would go away when he pleased.

You hurt the man when you caught hold of his arm and twisted it.  I was never bothered with the police until I got to Wallan. There were men near Holmes and I asked them to come to the court to give evidence, but they, would not come as they were. afraid he would put them in some night’.

Re-examined- ‘I heard Anderson say I am the boss of Wallan’.

The case was dismissed.

____________________________

After the Tower Hotel was delicensed on 31 Dec 1916, restitution of £500 was made to the owner and £50 to the Licensee. 

In 1917 CR Hunt took over the Canadian Hotel in Seymour.

The Tower Hotel was the 4th building on this site, and after the Hotel was delicensed it became a guest house and rest home (also recorded as being a nursing home).

On 14 June 1926 the building owned by DH Rae, caught fire and was totally destroyed with only the chimneys remaining standing. 

The site the remained vacant until 1935 when the Laffan Bros. built and opened a Garage there – with the underground storage petrol tank, being built in the cellar of the former hotel.  Several years later the garage was destroyed in a fire and its was rebuilt by the Laffan’s.

MAGUIRES HOTEL (1874)

– this Wallan Wallan hotel is a mystery, with its precise location unknown.  It could well refer to one of the ‘other’ Hotels in Wallan  Wallan (recorded within this article) possibly a premises to the East of the township and near the NE railway line that was being constructed at that time – where hotels and stores could earn a decent living.  _ Maguire may well have been the licensee of one  of the local hotels already recorded within here ?

PremisesLicenseeOwnerEarliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
Maguires Hotel _ Maguire ?  ?July 1874 July 1874

The sole reference to Maguires Hotel at Wallan Wallan appeared in the Argus on Wed 1 July 1874 into an extremely long article regarding the Elections and Qualifications Committee and a Petition against Mr FR Godfrey MLA from the East Bourke electorate, per the recent elections held.  Within the article appears the following reference in passing –

Mr McCormick said he would withdraw that case, as he had plenty of others. On the polling day, March 25th, the same scenes occured at Maguire’s Hotel, Wallan Wallan where the electors were treated by M. Godfrey’s agents.

There after the premises disappear into history

PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL (1873 to 1894c)

also known as  Heaneys Hotel / Camerons Hotel

– location SE corner of Watson St and the Northern Hwy (from 1935 this was the site of the new police station which formerly had been diagonally across the road from the Woodman Arms. The former police station ‘ended its life’ as a hardware shop, before it was eventually demolished in the mid 1970s.

PremisesLicensee
&
Owner
Earliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
LandNett
Value
£  
Prince of Wales
Hotel
Licensee & Owner –
Allan Cameron
(for a number of
years)
24
April
1873
(opened)
   
Prince of Wales
Hotel

(also referred
to as Heaneys
Hotel)
Licensee – Mrs
Eleanor Heaney

Owner – Allan
Cameron
Sept
1874
Sept
1875 
 &
land
28
Prince of Wales
Hotel
Licensee – Mrs
Eleanor Heaney
(John Cooney’s
mother in law)

Owner – Allan
Cameron
Sept
1875
Feb
1878
 25
 dittoLicensee –
Eleanor Heaney

Owner – Allan
Cameron
1878 1879 25
Camerons
Hotel
Licensee &
Owner – Allan
Cameron
1880Sept
1882
14
acres
31/10/-
 dittoLicensee &
Owner – Allan
Cameron
Sept
1883
Sept
1884
14
acres
36/10/-
(no details
available)
Owner – Allan
Cameron
18851889  
Camerons
Hotel
Licensee &
Owner – Allan
Cameron
1889 14
acres
14
ditto
(also included
a General Store
within the
premises from
1890c)
Licensee &
Owner – Allan
Cameron
1890 3
acres
45
 dittoLicensee &
Owner – Allan
Cameron
1891 7
acres
25
 dittoLicensee &
Owner – Allan
Cameron
189218937
acres
45
  ditto Licensee &
Owner – Allan
Cameron
18931894c14
acres
36/10/-
appears to
have been
DELICENSED
at the end
of 1894 but
remained as
a General
Store
Nathaniel
Thomas
Randell
(shop
keeper)
to
1910c
LATER
DESTROYED
BY FIRE
on 21 Nov 1927
     

When the Prince of Wales Hotel opened on 24 April 1873 it was of some five rooms, and had a ballroom.

Due to increasing business in 1874 extensions were made to the Hotel.  The additions included a apartments of spacious and a elegant room for public meetings etc complete with ballroom (per JW Payne).

Francis Heaney was the mother in law of Mary Ann Cooney who died 31 Dec 1877 aged only 27.

By Dec 1880  the premises were of 12 rooms (exclusive of those required by the family)

Allan Cameron died in July 1901 (having married Margaret Kylet in 1875)

The licensed premises also included a Store from the early 1890s.  The Store remained open after the Hotel were delicensed (possibly at the end of 1894c), and was run by Nathaniel T Randell (also see Strangeways Hotel) until 1910c.

Allan Cameron in 1990 can be found as putting in a tender for the transfer of mail from Wallan Wallan to the Railway Station and return – was he also the Post Master at this time ? This would be a tidy fit per Parkers Hotel and Boarding House from the 888 part of this article (as detailed further on).

After which the premises became the home of William Stockdale and his family. 

On the evening of 28 Feb 1902 at the Presbyterian Church, Wallan Wallan – a presentation was made to the widow of Allan Cameron who was leaving the District, in which she received a very neat silver tea and coffee service, suitably inscribed.  After the presentation a very sociable evening of music and harmony took place.

28 April 1926 Mrs Margaret Cameron died at the residence of her son-in-law Mr CH Smith ‘Doogallocc’, Toolangi House, Healesville aged 76 . (widow of Allan Cameron) after having been in indifferent health for some time

The building was destroyed by fire on 21 Nov 1927

________________________________

Colonial Wine License and Billiard Hotel (1888 to 1891c ?)

&

Parkers Hotel and Boarding House (1888 to 1891c ?)

Further research is required here on the above and following –

In March 1888 Walter Parker as detailed above went out of business at the Railway Hotel, and he and his wife entered into two new business ventures/enterprises locally – of which not a lot it known about, other than –

Mrs Parker obtained a license to open the Wallan Colonial Wine License & Billiard Hotel whilst her husband Walter opened up Parkers Hotel & Boarding House.  Apparently DR McGregor had an interest in the building which were described large and made of timber (he having an interest in both the Royal Oak and Railway Hotels at Wallan East in the periods of at least 1872 to 1901)

It is likely (very possible) that both of these ‘premises’ were ‘under the same roof’ .

PremisesLicenseeOwnerEarliest
Date
Known
Latest
Date
Known
LandNett
Value
£
Colonial
Wine
License
&
Billiard
Hotel
Mrs ParkerMrs
(Walter)
Parker
from
1888
18911
acre
52
Parkers
Hotel
&
Boarding
House
Walter
Parker
(publican)
Walter
Parker
Feb
1888
18912.5
acres
34
Parkers
Boarding
House
Walter
Parker
Sept
1891
1
acre
35
1894c to
1902c
(details
unknown)
      
DESTROYED
BY FIRE
in 1902c

That (JW Payne 1981) suggestion that the premises were across the road from the former store and post office  – this is a tidy fit as to the premises being in the Wallan Wallan township – as there was once a store on the SE of corner of Watson St and Sydney Rd (the former Prince of Wales Hotel) was the PO situated there as well at this time ? This would position the premises as on the corner of Watson St and Sydney Rd (possibly likely on the SW cnr ?).  He further detailed that the premises were destroyed in a fire 1902c.

When the Tower  Hotel was built in 1905 – there were three or four rooms set aside for billiard players – an popular past time in this era.  Indeed Billiard Halls had to be licensed – and this would likely have filled the void left by the Parkers for this sport.

Co-incidently maybe, in 1902 the store and post office at Wallan East were purportedly destroyed by fire (though the event is not recorded in the Press) – it is later recorded that they were later rebuilt and open again by 1904. 

A weakness in the Wallan East suggestion is that the premises were detailed as being across the road from the store and PO (and south of the Hall – which adjoined the Railway Hotel), thus this would have placed Parkers new premises on Railway property. 

However what with all DR McGregor’s other business interests having been located at Wallan East for a period of almost 30 yrs it would make sense that the premises used by the Parkers for their new business venture in 1888 were located at Wallan East.  Certainly there would have been a need to cater for the accommodation requirements in Wallan East for the many men in the employ of the Victorian Railways  ?  But would DR McGregor really have desired another licensed premise on his ‘patch’ at Wallan East ?

On the NW cnr of the intersection of Watson St and Sydney Rd the PO was situated there for many decades until it was destroyed by fire in 1975.

24 April 1890 – Kilmore Court

John Leahy V Walter Parker

John Leahy for work done, a debt of £5/7/2d

Order made for £4/2/- and £1/13/6 costs

Part 5 – Licensed Premises

to the immediate South of Wallan Wallan

CAMERONS HOTEL / INVERLOCHY CASTLE HOTEL (1850c to 1909)

– located on the west side of the Kilmore Rd, 1 mile south of Wallan Wallan

Strangeways, McLeods and the Inverlochy Castle Hotel all detailed above

Site of former INVERLOCHY CASTLE HOTEL (1854c to 1909)

 (a three part story previously researched by Richard Cooper – the articles appearing at oldplaces.com.au)

PremisesLicensee
&
Owner
Earliest
Known
Date
Last
Known
Date
Land
Size
Nett
Value
£
Camerons
Hotel
Angus
Cameron
 1850  
Inverlochy
Castle
Hotel/Inn
Angus
Cameron
26
May
1854
26
May
1854
88
acres
 
dittoAngus
Cameron
(innkeeper)
bef
1
Dec
1854
   
  ditto         ?from 
26
May
1854 
 88
acres
 
Inverlochy
Castle
Hotel
 Sold
after
Sept
1855
 88
acres
 
  ditto John
Laffan
(leased)

Owner –
Benjamin
Clarke
Brettell
18571857  
  ditto likely –
John
Laffan
(leased) ?

Owner –
Benjamin
Clarke
Brettell
18
May
1858
Dec
1858
88
acres
 
Inverlochy
Castle
Hotel
(Laffans
Hotel)
John
Laffan
brou-
ght
Hotel
in
Dec
1858
to
1862
110
acres
165
  ditto John
Laffan
18621864Hotel
&
Land
110
  ditto John
Laffan
1865 Hotel
&
Land
126
  ditto John
Laffan
1866 Hotel
&
Land
108
  ditto John
Laffan
1867   
  ditto John
Laffan
18681871 60
  ditto John
Laffan
18711872210
acres
 
  ditto John
Laffan
18721873Hotel
only
27
  ditto John
Laffan
18731874Hotel
only
60
  ditto John
Laffan
18741875  
  ditto John
Laffan
18751876Hotel
only
27
  ditto John
Laffan
18761877Hotel
&
Land
100
  ditto John
Laffan
18771878360
acres
115
  ditto John
Laffan
18781881  
  ditto John
Laffan
18811885530
acres
150
  ditto John
Laffan
18851886610
acres
57/10/-
  ditto John
Laffan
18861887650
acres
179/10/-
  ditto John
Laffan
18871888867
acres
237/10/-
  ditto John
Laffan
18881890867
acres
232-
  ditto John
Laffan
18901895 40
  ditto John
Laffan
18951896  
  ditto John
Laffan
189616
May 
1901
 
ditto Esther
Laffan
17
May
1901
Sept
1901
 35
ditto Esther
Laffan
Sept
1901
1904  
  ditto John
Francis
Laffan
(he made
extensive
improve-
ments to
the Hotel
in 1907)
19041907  
  ditto John
Francis
Laffan
19081909  
DELICENSED
Dec 1909
     
Remnants of
the derelict
building were
pulled down
in the late
1970s

On the passing of Angus Cameron (victualler) the hotel of some 14 rooms and 88 acres was offered for sale in March 1855 (of 14rooms) by his creditors for £800.  The property did not sell immediately and was advertised again in the September of 13 rooms. Failing to sell the hotel was it was Let for 3 years until it was purchased by a Benjamin Clarke Brettell – and no sooner has be purchased the property than he offered it for sale for sale between  the May and June of 1858.  The property was then purchased  by John Laffan.

Benjamin Clarke Brettell (with to LLs) may well have been the 21 yo who had arrived at Hobart Town, VDL onboard the convict ship the ‘Lord Melville’ on 17 Dec 1818 after having been sentenced to 14 years at the. Worcester Assizes on 7 March 1818. On 1 Dec 1830 he was Pardoned. After he gained his freedom he can be found as appearing before the Insolvency Court in May, June and August of 1855.  He had been a Licensed Victualler at the Sydney hotel in William St, Melbourne. His assets at this time were to the value of  £221/4/- and his Liabilities totaled Value £1035.  After his selling of the Inverlochy Hotel he moved to Kyneton.  At the hearing only one case was proven – the learned Commisioner said that the insolvent had been satisfactorily explained his transactions at the previous meeting.  The only assets consisted of the furniture of the Sydney Hotel, of which the insolvent had been the lessee . The report of the Official Assignee was to the effect that a dividend was extremely improbable.  The Commissioner said that the insolvent se deserved credit for having contracted so few liabilities.  The insolvent was allowed to retain his bedroom furniture, and the meeting closed (per the Argus Wed 8 August 1855)

The Age Monday 17 May 1858

1904 Esther Laffan (wife of the late John) had the license transferred to her son John Francis Laffan.

Inverlochy Castle Hotel (1854c to 1909)
formerly Camerons hotel (1850c-1854c)

In 1908, thirteen hotels had been closed in South Melbourne alone by the License Reduction Board. In response to these closures, hotel owners knew that in order to survive, they would need to upgrade their services and premises, and renovations to existing hotels reflect these changes.  Only two years after undertaking his own extensive renovations, John Francis Laffan had to appear before the Licenses Reduction Board as the owner and licensee of the Inverlochy Castle Hotel in order to argue the case for the hotel retaining its licence. The Licensing Board was responsible for regulating the number of hotels in a district in relation to the number of residents, and as part of the Broadmeadows District, the Inverlochy Castle Hotel was one of several hotels deemed that weren’t needed and Laffan’s case was refused, and the hotel delicensed. John Francis Laffan was forced to close the Inverlochy Castle Hotel despite the new improvements (KFP 10 June 1909 & 1 July 1909)

______________________________

Part 6 – Licensed Premises to the East

of the Wallan Wallan township

Prior to circa 1930 the township of Wallan Wallan and Wallan East were in most instances referred to generally as one in Wallan Wallan.   There were occasional  references to Wallan Wallan as the Wallan Township – to differentiate between the two localities. 

In the late 1800s the there was a Wallan East tennis club formed, by which name it ‘went’. It was not until the early 1930s that the local cricket and football teams there began to use the Wallan East name – prior to this the cricket club at Wallan East had been known as the Wallan Railways CC.  

Sites of Hotels to the east of the Wallan Wallan Township

 THE GAP INN (1860c to 1861)

– located on Allotment 54 (roughly triangular in shape)of about 40 acres in Hadfield Lane (about one mile south of the Woodstock Rd (Gap Rd (later upper Plenty Road) ‘T’ intersection.

PremisesLicensee
/ Owner
Earliest
Known
Date
Last
Known
Date
Land
Size
Nett
Value
£
Crown
Allotment
54
Mark Hayes
(land only) 
    
Gap Inn
(and store)
Robert
Almond
(store-
keeper
&
Hotel
License)
bef
Aug
1861
Oct
1861
 45
DESTROYED
BY FIRE
13 Oct 1861
     

On 13 Oct 1861 a fire destroyed the Gap Inn in suspicious circumstances, with  reward of  £50 being offered for any information. The premises were not rebuilt at this location.

Whilst the destroyed Gap Inn was not rebuilt, a mile further north of the site, Crown Allotment 58 on the SE corner of the ’T’ junction of the Woodstock and Gap Rds (later renamed Upper Plenty Rd) was purchased by purchased by Mark Hayes. It is possible that Robert Almond was previous owner of this Allotment ? 

Amy Almond (daughter of Robert) later married Edward Brian Hayes relationship ???

THE GAP INN (1862c to 1864c)

– at new location

Robert Almond is recorded a hotel licensee and storekeeper in 1862. Then in Dec 1863, the Gap Inn was recorded in the Kilmore Advertiser as being 3 miles out of Wallan Wallan along a bush track and being situated on the junction of the Woodstock and Gap (Upper plenty) Rds – adding that the timber Public House was small but suited for the traffic along the road. Thus a ‘new’ Gap Inn was indeed opened from 1863. In Oct 1862 there is reference to the premises as being Wyatt’s General Store), there is also some evidence that suggests there were building/s on this Allotment before August 1861 ? Whatever the Gap Inn may not have remained licensed for very long as by Sept 1865 the premises are recorded as solely being John Wyatt’s General Store. storekeeper.

Then in 1868 John Wyatt applied for a Beer License which was granted.  This enabled him to sell beer provided the bottle was not opened and consumed within his store.

Then in Jan 1868 John Wyatt applied for, and was granted a Beer License, is that he could sell beer from his store but it could not be opened or consumed on the premises. The premises at this time were by this time recorded as being a building of grand brick, with some 8 rooms.

PremisesLicensee
/ Owner
Earliest Known
Date
Last
Known
Date
Land SizeNett Value
£
Crown
Allotment 58
purchased
before Aug
1861 
Owner –
Mark Hayes
Gap InnRobert Almond
(proprietor)

Owner either –
Mark Hayes
or
Robert Almond ?
July
1860
Sept
1862
91
acres
  40
Wyatts
General
Store

 Oct 1862   
Gap InnSept
1862
Dec
1863
Gap Inn
&
General
Store
likely
John Wyatt ? 

Owner –
Edward Hayes
Apr
1864
(offered
for Let)
91
acres
Period
1865 to 1867
ref. to
Wyatt’s
General
Store
Oct 1862
likely
not
licensed
by
1865 ?
StoreJohn Wyatt
(storekeeper)

Owner –
Edward Hayes
Sept
1865
  15
dittoJohn Wyatt
(storekeeper)

Owner –
Edward Hayes
Sept
1866
  13
 dittoJohn Wyatt
(storehand)

Owner –
Edward Hayes
Sept
1867
Dec
1867
  30
(&
land)
Store &
Beer
License
(at the
Wallan
Wallan
Gap)
John Wyatt
(storekeeper
&
beer license)

Owner –
Edward Hayes
from
Jan
1868
Sept
1868
 40
 dittoJohn Wyatt
(beer license)

Owner –
Edward Hayes
 aft
July
1870
&
bef.
Apr
1871
  
Gap Inn
(ref. to)
Apr
1870
bef.
Apr
1871

In March and April 1862 the premises were recorded as the Gap Inn were offered to let with 91 acres TO LET – apply to proprietor Robert Almond.

Ref to Gap Inn at Wallan Wallan
Edward Findlay (of the adjoining farm)
The Argus Tues 28 Sept 1862

In April 1864 the premises advertised as the Gap Inn were offered to let with 50 acres – Edward Hayes (now of Chiltern, Vic).

Sept 1866 from the Rates Book reference to John Wyatt being a storekeeper (no mention of the Inn).

______________________________

In Jan 1868  John Wyatt who rented the premises from Edward Hayes (a brick building of 8 rooms), and conducted a store there applied for a  ‘Beer license’ to sell beer from his store – with reference to residing at the Wallan Wallan Gap.

The Argus Thurs 9 Jan 1868

Nov 1870 reference to the Gap Inn, Wallan Wallan once again (per the argus)

By Apr 1871 the premises/store no longer held a Beer License.  By the  end of the year John Wyatt successfully applied for a new license and he opened the Rose & Crown Hotel,  a further half mile north of his former business in a Store with a Beer License

ROSE & CROWN HOTEL (1872 to 1905)

Location – was built on the NW corner of the ‘old’ ‘T’ junction of tracks leading to Wandong, North Station & Woodstock Roads (half a mile north of the second Gap Hotel). Built by John Wyatt (formerly storekeeper and holder of a Beer License at the ‘T’ junction of the Woodstock and Gap (Upper Plenty) Rds.

PremisesLicenseeEarliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
Land
Size
Nett
Value
£
General
Store (only)
John Wyatt
(Storekeeper)


& Owner

 Dec
1871
  
Rose & Crown
Hotel
John Wyatt
(possibly store
as well ?)

& Owner
1
Jan
1872
Dec
1872
  
The Rose
(abbv.) /
Rose Inn /
Wyatts Rose
Hotel
John Wyatt
(possibly store
as well ?)

& Owner
1873Sept
1873 
 25
Rose & Crown
Hotel
John Wyatt
(possibly store
as well ?)

& Owner
Sept
1874
 70
acres
10
 dittoJohn Thomas
Wyatt
(possibly store
as well ?)

& Owner
Sept
1875
 117
acres
48
 ditto John Wyatt
(publican &
storekeeper)

& Owner
18781879 66
ditto John Wyatt

& Owner
18801881172
acres
&
house
(£6)
50
 ditto John Wyatt

& Owner
188118820.5
acre
50
 ditto John Wyatt

& Owner
188218842
acres
50
 ditto John Wyatt

& Owner
18841886172
acres
50
 ditto John Wyatt

& Owner
188718881 acre27
 ditto John Wyatt

& Owner
1889Sept
1890
172
acres
50
 ditto John Wyatt

& Owner
Sept
1890
Nov
1890
172
acres 
at
£30
25
 ditto Ellen Wyatt
(Victuallers
License – for
Wallan
District)

& Owner
Dec
1890
Dec
1891
170
acres
25
 ditto Ellen Wyatt
(Victuallers
Colonial
License)

& Owner
Jan
1892
Sept
1892
Retained
20 acres
at £20
  25
Rose & Crown
Hotel
(Merri Merri)
Licensee –
Albert Edwin
Clayton
(of Richmond)

Owner –
George Clayton
Sept
1892
Sept
1893
 17
Rose & Crown
Hotel
Licensee –
Albert Edwin
Clayton

Owner –
George Clayton
Sept
1893
Sept
1894
 25
 dittoLicensee –
Albert Edwin
Clayton &
George Clayton

Owner –
George Clayton
Sept
1894
Sept
1896
 25
Rose & Crown  
Hotel
Licensee –

Owner –
George Clayton
Sept 1896 Sept
1896  
  25
DESTROYED
BY FIRE
11 Sept 1896
Rose & Crown  
Hotel
Licensee –

Owner –
George Clayton
189731
Dec
1898
Rose & Crown  
Hotel
(new premises
were possibly
not reopened
until 1899 ?)
Licensee –
Margaret Clayton
(wife of George)

Owner –
George Clayton
1
Jan
1899
30
Oct
1902
dittoLicense & Owner –
Margaret Clayton
(wife of George)
– widow
31
Oct
1902
Mar
1905
Hotel was
DELICENSED
sometime
during 1905

John Wyatt who was running a general store in Dec 1871 had his application for a Hotel License looked upon favourably. A building of 5 rooms (aside though exclusive for family) and the Hotel opened on 1 Jan 1872 – it appears that he likely continued to operate his store from witihn the same premises through until 1878/79.

From License Meeting held on 12 Dec 1871
KFP Thurs 21 Dec1871

In August 1873 an application was made to the Merriang Shire Council to grub, split and clear all the timber on the road between Wyatt’s Rose Hotel and O’Shannessy’s swamp (north of Lightwood Crossing).  The following year a similar John Stevenson made a similar request to the Council to grub, clear and cart away timber on the road from the old Gap Inn and Wyatt’s Rose Inn.

Reference in 1878 regarding repairs to the Gap Rd, between the old Gap Inn and the top of the range near Jacks house (again this is likely a reference to the former premises that was originally Wyatt’s  store.

Whilst maintaining his interest in the Rose & Crown, in Jan 1875 John Wyatt and a John Griffin were granted a renewal of their license for the Farmers Arms Hotel in Willow Mavin.  NB: Mr & Mrs Griffin are known to have been the licensees of this hotel in before this time, with the Hotel likely being delicensed by 1880c (no other details available per this research).

A John Wyatt Smith was charged with larceny in May 1882.  He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 14 days imprisonment at the Kilmore gaol.

On 7 March 1884 – an ‘Action for Slander’ was brought by Joseph Evans the CofE lay preacher at Wallan against John Wyatt a Hotelkeeper for damages totalling £2000.  The case for the plaintiff was – that the defendant accused him of a criminal assault of a girl whereby he was deprived of his situation until he should clear his character.  _ Purves& Mr Mitchell for the plaintiff and Dr Madden  & Mr Fos for the defendant.  The rebutting case for the plaintiff, as to the plea of justification was proceeded with.  The judge in  summing up, seemed to favour the plaintiff as to the fact whether the charge was true, but stating that in his opinion the case was a  privileged one, he seemed to direct no malice had been proved against the defendant, the jury pleaded – Damages of £350 awarded.  Joseph Evans had at the time been residing at the house of John Wyatt.

The passing of Mr & Mrs Wyatt

John Wyatt passed away at his Wallan Wallan residence on 30 October 1891 at the age of 63. His wife Ellen took over the victuallers license for several months after his demise.

Ellen Wyatt passed way at Wallan Wallan on 24 June 1895 ‘after an hour’s illness’ aged 58.  At the time of her death she was recorded as a grocer.  Her will was administered by John Wilson of the Tooborac Hotel. 

_____________________________

In Sept 1892 Albert Edwin Clayton formerly a barman, became the licensee.  Whilst George Clayton ‘formerly’ of the Laurel Hotel, Hotham Hill, Melbourne became the owner.  Between at least Dec 1894 and Sept 1895 George was also working as the licensee.

11 Sept 1896 at about 10pm the Rose and Crown Hotel at Wallan East owned and occupied by George Clayton was destroyed by fire.  The origin of the fire was a mystery, with both Mr & Mrs Campbell being absent at the time.

George Clayton later became the licensee of the Travellers Rest at Wandong .   David Pickup the owner of Pickups Hotel had  died sometime before Mar 1883 and the license was transferred to his wife Mary.  Later the hotel became known as the Travellers Rest. and in Mar 1887 the license was transferred from Charles Pickup (son of David & Mary) to George Clayton (of 7 rooms), and there he remained the nominee until at least Aug 1899.

The Travellers Rest when still license burnt to the ground on 22 May 1933.  The License was surrendered in the July of that Yea, with the Owner receiving £475 and Occupier £125 compensation Mar 1933 at which time the premises were under the management of James Parkes.

_____________________________

In March 1905 Margaret Clayton of the Rose & Crown applied for a 15 year mining lease on 30 acres of her property –situated approx. 1 mile NE of the Wallan Railway Station.

KFP Thurs 23 March 1905

The Hotel was Delicensed  sometime in 1905.

The passing of George & Margaret Clayton

On 30 Oct 1902 George Clayton (native of Bristoe, Yorkshire) passed away at his residence in Wallan Wallan (East). In moving tribute from his family, was recorded a ‘though sad we marked the closing eyes, of him we loved in days gone by, and sweet in death his latest song, we will meet again, it will not be long’.  He formerly also was the licensee of the Laurel Hotel, Hotham Hill.

Laurel Hotel, North Melbourne
corner Dryburgh and Wood Streets,
(latter day photo 1960c – now delicensed)

At the time of his death he was also the owner of the Laurel Hotel in North Melbourne – his suppliers being Used Melbourne Spirit Merchants, the Victoria Brewery and McCracken’s Brewery.  He left a large Estate.

Widowed for many years, Margaret Clayton (still of Wallan East) passed away on 8 Aug 1924 aged 83, at the residence of her son at Henry South Brunswick. Her remains were interred at the Booroondara cemetery.   It was recorded that she had many friends who esteemed her a highly for manifold good qualities, and that she was the mother of a large family.  In addition is was noted that she was ever foremost in any good cause, and was years ago an occasional contributor to the Kilmore Free Press (ie as the Wallan Wallan/Wallan East Correspondent).  She was keen in writing on local topics in prose and her poetry being highly appreciated.

She left real estate valued at £1905 and personal property valued at £1942 to her children.

It is likely that Margaret Clayton lived out her years in the former Rose and Crown Hotel with her obituary recording that she had been resident of Wandong and Wallan East for many years.

McCracken’s Brewery(1909)  – 349 Collins St, Melbourne
Victoria Brewing Company, East Melbourne (Est. 1854)

ROYAL OAK HOTEL (1870c-1874c)

(aka Johnstons Royal Oak Hotel, Johnstons Railway Hotel, Heggins Railway Hotel)

As to when the Royal Oak Hotel ceased to trade and the Railway Hotel first opened cannot be clearly established. It is also not known if both these premises were open at the same time. Possibly the Royal Oak may have ceased trading between 1874 and 1879 – it is difficult to ascertain the premises remained licensed after the opening of the nearby Railway Hotel.

– located at the SE side of railway crossing at Wallan East

The premises of Crown Allotment 40 were originally a General Store with the property being of 3 sitting room & 4 bedrooms. 

Was offered for sale in March 1870 by Mr Hearne.

The Argus Thursday 20 June 1872

1872 (per above) – tenders called for the erection of a brick hotel near the Wallan Wallan Railway Station

It is difficult to ascertain when exactly the Royal Oak Hotel license was transferred to the Railway Hotel opposite the new railway station.  For the purpose of this article the date and recorded evidence the dated ‘used’ is from 1875……….

PremisesLicensee
&
Owner
Earliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
LandNett
Value
£
originally
was a Store  
 Owner – Mr Hearne
 Mar
1870
  
(application
for a
Beer License
– possibly
was rejected ?)
Robert James
Roulston ?

Owner – Mr Hearne
Apr
1870
1
acre ?
Royal Oak Hotel 
&
Johnstons Royal
Oak Hotel
Licensee-
J Johnston(e)

Owner –
Mr Hearne
bef.
May
1870
Railway HotelLicensee –
J Johnston(e)

Owner –
Mr Hearne
Sept
1870
   
Royal Oak Hotel  
&
Johnstons Royal
Oak Hotel
Licensee –
J Johnston(e)

Owner –
Mr Hearne
 Jan
1872
  
ditto         ?Jan
1872
June
1872
Laffans
(Johnstons)
Railway Hotel
(tenders called
for construction
of – in brick)
Licensee –
Thomas Johnston

Owner –
John Laffan /
DR McGregor
21
June
1872
1874 80
Royal Oak Hotel Licensee –

Owner –
Henry Barber ?
1874   
the former ROYAL OAK HOTEL (licensed 1870c to 1874c)

2 Mar 1869 at Wallan Wallan Robert James Roulston purchased Allotment 21- of 1 acre, 1 rood, 11 perches for £5/5/6d.

Apr 1870  Robert James Roulston (a bootmaker & shoemaker in Wallan Wallan) made an Application for a beer license in a house at Wallan Wallan consisting of 3 sitting rooms and 4 bedrooms (exclusive of those required for use by family) – another entry has of 4 sitting rooms and 3 bedrooms.  The premises were presently unlicensed and the application appears to have possibly been rejected ? After 1870 he cannot he found recorded in any further Wallan Wallan records.

KFP Thurs 24 March 1870

Friday 20 October 1871 – Kilmore Court

before A P Akehurst, Esq. PM

Jamea Middleton v. Robert James Roulston for assault

For for assault. Mr Twigg for complainant. Dismissed without costs.

_______________________________

May 1870 Wallan Wallan Annual Races at Royal Oak Hotel (Johnston’s)

Post 1870 the Hotel was recorded as of 5 rooms (exclusive of those required by the family)

June 1872 request for tender of Laffans Railway Hotel at the Station, licensed – per DR McGregor

August 1873 Thomas Johnston approached the local Council, asking that its considers making a crossing near the  Public House

In June 1867 a case was held at the Donnybrook Court house that was of more than usual interest in that Thomas Johnston of Wallan Wallan was charged with having stolen goods in his possession. In evidence given it was stated that in the May in 1867 a Carrier  named Crane was camped near Wallan Wallan and that he had part of the contents of a bale of drapery goods stolen from his dray.  The goods had been purchased at King and Parsons in Melbourne  and were consigned to a storekeeper in Kilmore.  The police had searched the premises occupied by Johnston(e) and found some articles corresponding with some that were stolen. The bench thought though that the evidence not sufficiently clear to commit the prisoner, who was consequently discharged. The Courtroom had been crammed to excess due to the interest in the case.

In 1874 (and recorded with ‘conjecture’) that Henry Barber brought the Railway Hotel from John Laffan ?  Another reference that by 28/8/1874 the Hotel had been rebuilt, and John Laffan then almost immediately advertised it for sale.

Though not conclusive it is also highly possible that when the new brick hotel was built in the period 1872-1874 this was was actually the new premises directly across from the Wallan East Railway Station ……..? At which time upon the opening of the new Hotel in 1874 the Royal Oak Hotel closed its doors.

Dec 1874 Dr McGregor (wine merchant, Queen St, Melbourne) offered the hotel as For Let.

Dec 1874 Transfer of License.

18/8/1874 – Court Case

Hepburn V Gorman & _______  

Plaintiff seeking damages for none observance of maintaining of a hotel, leased to defendants & occupier by the name of Johnston and not having kept certain premises in good replacement 70 acres.

he long since delicensed ROYAL OAK HOTEL at Wallan East
– centre, horizon, to the left of railway crossing –
possible remnants of the long since delicensed ROYAL OAK HOTEL at Wallan East
– on horizon, to the left of railway crossing –

18 Nov 1895 Henry Barber Snr who came to the Colony in 1842 passed away at Wallan Wallan aged 87

RAILWAY HOTEL (1874c to 2019c)

(also known as Parkers Hotel, Bonds Hotel, Nurses Hotel)

As eluded to above this Hotel may well have opened as early as 1874 (this period is ‘for now’ recorded in the records of the Royal Oak Hotel), on Crown Allotment 8.

– located opposite Wallan East Railway Station.

Hotel recorded as of 18 rooms and a billiard room (likely when the hotel that was rebuilt in 1873 – on the same site or opposite the Railway Station ?)

– recorded as of 10 rooms in 1880 (exclusive of those required by the family)

The Railway Hotel was rebuilt again in timber it appears in 1888 by William Bond


Premises
 LicenseeEarliest
Date
Known
Latest
Date
Known 
Land  Nett
Value
£
(new building
offeredand
advertised as
For Sale
28 Aug 1874)
Licensee –
Thomas
Johnston

Owner –
John Laffan /
DR McGregor
1874187480
(was this new
building
– per above –
on the new
site across
from the
Railway Stn ?)
Licensee –
John Johnston
then
John Laffan

Owner –
John Laffan /
DR McGregor
1874187580
Heggins HotelLicensee –
James Heggins

Owner –
John Laffan &
DR McGregor ?
Sept
1873
Dec
1874
27
Heggins HotelLicencee –
WA Young

Owner –
John Laffan
&
DR McGregor
Dec
1874  
80
Railway HotelLicensee –
John Johnston

Owner –
John Laffan
&
DR McGregor
early
1875
187527
dittoLicensee –
Bridget Johnston  

Owner –
John Laffan
&
DR McGregor
18751876Hotel,
House
&
Land
27
dittoLicensee –
Bridget Johnston

Owner –
John Laffan
&
DR McGregor
1876Hotel,
House
&
Land
of
204
acres
90
dittoLicensee –
Bridget Johnston

Owner –
DR McGegor
18761879Hotel,
House
&
Land
27
Parkers
Railway 
Hotel
Licensee –
Walter Parker

Owner –
DR McGegor
bef .
Sept
1880
Sept
1886
1
acre
27
Railway HotelLicensee –
Walter Parker
(Victualler)

Owner –
DR McGegor
Sept
1886
Mar
1888
1
acre
reference to
Hotel being
REBUILT
in 1888 ?
Railway HotelLicensee –
William
John Bond
(Victualler)

Owner –
William John
Bond /
DR McGegor
Mar
1888
Sept
1888
1
acre
52
dittoLicensee –
William
John Bond

Owner –
William John
Bond /
DR McGegor
Sept
1889
Hotel
&
1
acre
27
&
75
ditto Licensee –
William
John Bond

Owner –
William John
Bond /
DR McGegor
189018911
acre
ditto Licensee –
William
John Bond

Owner –
William John
Bond /
DR McGegor
Sept
1892
Sept
1894
1
acre
48
ditto Licensee –
William
John Bond

Owner –
William John
Bond /
DR McGegor
Sept
1895
18976
acres
45
ditto Licensee –
William
John Bond

DR
McGregor
1898Sept
1901
dittoLicensee –
AR Row

Owner –
William John
Bond (?)
Sept
1901
1902
Bonds Railway
Hotel
Licensee &

Owner –
William
John Bond ?
190212
May
1907
dittoLicensee –
Mrs Margaret
Bond

Owner –
bef.
June
1908
2
Apr
1910
Bonds HotelLicensee –
likely Margaret
and/or
Hugh Bond

Owner –
Hugh Bond ?
3
Apr
1910
Sept
1910
48
dittolikely
Margaret
and/or
Hugh Bond

Owner –
Hugh Bond ?
Sept
1910
191348
Railway HotelThomas
Nurse
(freehold)

Owner –
1913Sept
1914
48
dittoThomas
Nurse
(freehold)

Owner –
Sept
1915
½
acre
75
dittoThomas
Nurse
(freehold)

Owner –
July
1918
dittoJohn Francis
Johnston (
freehold)

Owner –
July
1918
11 May
1924 (free-
hold)
dittoLicensees –
Annie &
John Watts
(of Malvern)

Owner –
Annie Watts ?
12
May
1924
July
1925
ditto Licensee –
Annie Watts

Owner –
July
1925
Oct
1925
ditto Licensee –
Lily M Thomas

Owner –
Oct
1925
dittoLicensee –
Miss Elsie
Spaul (Staul)

Owner –
Jan
1931
ditto     Mr & Mrs
Thomas

Owner –
DR McGregor
pre
Oct
1933
   
Wallan East
Hotel
Licensees –
Mr & Mrs
Thomas

Owner –
Feb
1934
Railway HotelLicensees –
Mr & Mrs
Thomas

Owner –
Dec
1934
Feb
1935

1875 – J Laffan sold his ‘new’ Hotel to John Johnston.

1882 clear reference to the Hotel now being  opposite the Railway Station

Feb 1888 Walter Parker went out of business at the Railway Hotel, with reference of William Bond taking over the premises.

1888 William John Bond & Melbourne Brewing & Malting Co.Ltd – the latter which existed between 1881 to 1896.

Melbourne Brewing & Malting Co. Ltd Wine & Spirit Store (1884)
Photo courtesy of the Royal Historical Society of Victoria Collection
Melbourne Brewing & Malting Co. Ltd

6 June 1899 – Kilmore Police Court (BAD LANGUAGE)

William Bond vs Dora Murphy for using obscene language at Wallan Wallan  was fined £4.

The passing of William John and Margaret Bond

William John Bond passed away on 13May 1907.

Margaret Bond passed away (across from the former store and post office) 2 April 1910 and was buried two days later.

William John Bond (Wallan Wallan Cemetery)

30 April 1910 death of George Scott Faithful (servant to William Bond for 16 years) at the Kilmore Hospital, aged 71.

10 Sept 1910 Railway Hotel for Auction of some 18 rooms, and billiard room and sports reserve.

___________________________

Court Case

Mrs Annie Watts against John Francis Johnson (July 1925) –

Present licensee and former licensee of the Railway Hotel, Wallan

Mrs Annie Watts of the Railway Hotel brought an action against John Francis Johnston (now of Moonee Ponds – also recorded as of Castlemaine) but formerly of the Railway Hotel, Wallan claiming that the precision of the contract for the purchase of the hotel, or alternatively £2450 damages.

The case being that in March 1924 Mrs Watts consulted Messsrs. Parker & Co. (Agents) who informed her that the Railway Hotel, Wallan was for sale and that the price was about £4000 and that the takings were about £ 70 a week. Accompanied by the husband and a representative of the Agent, she went to Wallan on 29 March.  Johnston informed them that he wished to sell the  hotel because of ill health, and that the compensation was  £76 a year, that the price wanted for the property was £4250, and that the profit were from £1200 to £1500 a year.  She went into the possession of the hotel on 12 May 1924, after having paid £2000 as a deposit.  The representations made, she alleged were false.

She also brought an action for the recession of the contract for the purchase the hotel, together with repayment of the sum of £2000 deposit that had been paid on the hotel or alternatively the sum of  £2400 damages being the difference between the price set out in the agreement and the true value true value of this property.

In cross examination Mrs Watts said the although she knew shortly after entering into the possession of the hotel on 12 May 1924 that the takings were much less than the amount represented to her and that it was not so profitable an investment as she had thought it to be.   She had not written to the defendant on the subject, and has complained to Johnston verbally about his representations.  She had not brought the action about because she had resolved to make every effort to improve the takings.

The defence was a denial, that the allegations had not taken place as alleged by the plaintiff, Johnston said that when Mrs Watts and her husband came to see him that the takings were £50 a week.  He could not remember whether he had been asked regarding his profits, but had certainly not said that they were between £1200 and £1500 a year.

The defendant under cross examination said that he did not know what his profits were, but assumed that he must have been making a profit.  His brother kept his books, and his brother provided the figures to a Mr Mann for the purpose of preparing defendant’s income tax return.

Overall a considerable amount of evidence was called.

Mr Justice MaFarlin said that the onus rested upon Mrs Watts to satisfy him that the representations complained of had been made.  The jury returned a verdict for the defendant.  Although the plaintiff had created a suspicion which the defendant’s evidence had not been wholly removed, he could not on the evidence of the plaintiff be satisfied that  there had been fraud in the transaction.  On the fraudulent details over the  bar takings of £75, when in effect it was only £50 a week  it was found in favour of Mrs Watts £250.

27 April 1926 -Kilmore Court of Petty Sessions

before Mr CJ Rogers, PM

Licencing Inspector V  Lily May Thomas

Lily May Thomas, for having certain persons on her licensed premises, the Railway hotel, Wallan on 13 March, during prohibited hours.  Fined £1 and 30/- costs – Paid.  A fine of 40/-4 was also ordered against same defendant for failing to have lodgers entry register look properly kept. Fine paid.

&

27 April 1926 (same day as above) – Kilmore Court of Petty Sessions

(before Mr CJ Rogers, PM) Licencing Inspector V  M Cahill and D Ray

Peter Thomson ws charged for for being on the licenced premises Railway Hotel, Wallan, during prohibited hours on 13 March, the the charge was dismissed, and the latter proved – fined £1 and 30s costs. Fine paid.

KFP 8 January 1931

The Railway Hotel had a hall attached to the premises, which made it a popular venue for hire especially for social occasions, sporting clubs and the like.  The Hall as some point became detached from the hotel and was dismantled in the early 1970s.

Railway Hotel, Wallan East 1930c
Railway Hotel, Wallan East 1930c

Part 7 – Summary

Year by Year Licensed Premises

The following charts details how many premises were licensed in any given year, in an around Wallan Wallan –

Premises1
8
4
5
1
8
4
6
1
8
4
7
1
8
4
8
1
8
4
9
1
8
5
0
1
8
5
1
1
8
5
2
1
8
5
3
1
8
5
4
Smith’s
‘House of
Entertainment
YYY?
Camerons Hotel
(to May 1854)
and therafter
known as the
Inverlochy Castle
Hotel
YYYYY
Budds Big Hill
Hotel
Y YYY
Strangeways
Hotel
Y
Total no. of
Licensed
Premises
1110012223
Premises1
8
5
5
1
8
5
6
1
8
5
7
1
8
5
8
1
8
5
9
1
8
6
0
18611
8
6
2
1
8
6
3
1
8
6
4
Inverlochy
Castle
Hotel
YYYYYYYYYY
Strangeways
Hotel
YYYYYYYYYY
Refreshment
Tent
(George Cooke)
Y
Refreshment
Licence
(George Hill)
Y
McLeods
Ardvreck
Hotel
YYYYYYY
Dwyers
/O’Dwyers
Big Hill
Hotel
YYYYYYY
Gap Inn
(also see
below)
?Y
Y
FIRE
Mossmans
Hotel
(& see
below)
YYYY
Gap Inn
(different
location)
?YYY
Hugh Sinclair
General
Store
(fined for
unlicensed
illegal trading)
was formerly
Mossmans
Hotel
N
Total no. of
Licences
Premises
3
+
2
3345+66544
Premises1
8
6
5
1
8
6
6
1
8
6
7
1
8
6
8
1
8
6
9
1
8
7
0
1
8
7
1
1
8
7
2
1
8
7
3
1
8
7
4
Inverlochy
Castle
Hotel
YY Y Y Y Y YY Y
Strangeways
Hotel
(a General Store
from 1869)
Y Y Y
Dwyers/
O’Dwyers
Big Hill
Hotel
Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y ?
Hugh Sinclair
General Store
&
Post Office
(fined for
unlicensed
illegal
trading)
premises
were
formerly
that of
Mossman’s
Hotel
N
MacDonald’s
General Store
(with Beer
Shop
License
from 1867)
and then
became
Macs Hotel
from 1874)
NYYYYYYY
Mac’s Hotel Y
Wyatts
General Store
(with Beer

License
from 1868)
NNNYYY Y
Rose & Crown
Hotel
YYY
Royal Oak
Hotel
YYYYY
Prince of
Wales
Hotel
YY
O’Dwyers
(General Store
from 1866-1873)
then the
Woodmans
Arms Hotel
(from 1874)
NNNNNNNNNY
Maguires Hotel
(was license
ever
approved ?)
?
Total no. of
Licences
Premises
434445555+5
Premises1
8
7
5
1
8
7
6
1
8
7
7
1
8
7
8
1
8
7
9
1
8
8
0
1
8
8
1
1
8
8
2
1
8
8
3
1
8
8
4
Inverlochy Castle
Hotel
YYY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
Mac’s HotelY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
Rose & Crown
Hotel
Y Y Y Y Y YYY Y Y
Prince of Wales
Hotel
(later Camerons
Hotel,
see below
YYYY
Camerons Hotel Y Y Y Y Y
Woodmans
Arms Hotel
Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
Railway HotelY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y YY
Total no. of
Licences
Premises
6666666666
Premises1
8
8
5
1
8
8
6
1
8
8
7
18881
8
8
9
1
8
9
0
1
8
9
1
1
8
9
2
1
8
9
3
1
8
9
4
Inverlochy
Castle
Hotel
YY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
Mac’s
Hotel
Y Y Y Y
FIRE
?? Y Y Y Y
Rose &
Crown
Hotel
YY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
Camerons
Hotel
Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
Woodmans
Arms Hotel
Y Y Y Y Y Y Y YY Y
Railway
Hotel
Y Y Y Y YY Y Y Y Y
Parkers
Colonial
Wine
License
and
Billiard
Hall
&

Parkers
Hotel and
Boarding
House
(later
destroyed
by fire
1902c)
Y Y Y Y?
Total no. of
Licences
Premises
66676+6+76+66
Premises189518961
8
9
7
1
8
9
8
1
8
9
9
1
9
0
0
1
9
0
1
19021
9
0
3
1
9
0
4
Inver-
lochy
Castle
Hotel
YY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
Mac’s
Hotel
Y
FIRE
?
Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
Rose &
Crown
Hotel
Y
Y
FIRE
?YYYYYY
Camerons
Hotel
?
Woodmans
Arms
Hotel
YY Y Y YY Y Y Y Y
Railway
Hotel
Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
the former –
Parkers
Colonial
Wine
License
and
Billiard
Hall
&
Parkers
Hotel
and
Boarding

House
FIRE
Total no. of
Licences
Premises
5+54+5555555
Premises19051
9
0
6
1
9
0
7
1
9
0
8
1
9
0
9
1
9
1
0
1
9
1
1
1
9
1
2
1
9
1
3
1
9
1
4
Inverlochy
Castle
Hotel
YY Y Y Y
Mac’s Hotel
(rebuilt as the
Tower Hotel
-see below)
Y
FIRE
?
Rose &
Crown
Hotel
Y
Tower Hotel
(on the site
of the
former Mac’s
Hotel)
Y YY Y Y YY Y
Woodmans
Arms
Hotel
Y YY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
Railway
Hotel
YY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
Total no. of
Licences
Premises
5444433333
Premises19151
9
1
6
1
9
1
7
1
9
1
8
1
9
1
9
1
9
2
0
1
9
2
1
1
9
2
2
1
9
2
3
1
9
2
4
Tower HotelYY
Woodmans
Arms
Hotel
Y
FIRE

Y
YYYYYYYY
Railway
Hotel
YYYYYYYYYY
Total no.
of
Licences
Premises
3322222222
Premises1
9
2
5
192619271
9
2
8
1
9
2
9
1
9
3
0
1
9
3
1
1
9
3
2
1
9
3
3
1
9
3
4
Woodmans
Arms
Hotel
Y
Y
FIRE
YYYYYYYY
Railway
Hotel
YYYYYYYYYY
the former
Tower
Hotel
FIRE
the former
Prince of
Wales
Hotel
/
Camerons
Hotel
FIRE
Total no.
of
Licences
Premises
2222222222
Premises19351936193719381939
Woodmans Arms Hotel
(rebuilt as the Wallan Hotel)
see blow –
Y
FIRE
Wallan HotelYYY
Railway HotelYYYYY
Total no. of
Licences Premises
21222

List of Hotel Fires

HotelDate of
Fire
Licensee
/ Owner
Hotel
Hotel
Re-

built
Rebuilt As
(Date
Reopened)
Licensee/
Owner
Gap Inn

premises were
licensed at the
time of the fire
13 Oct
1861
(susp-

icious)
Robert Almond
(& store-
keeper)
No*A new Gap
Inn was
opened 1
mile North
of this Inn
after these
premises
were bur-
nt down
(1862)
Mac’s Hotel

premises were
licensed at the
time of the fire
1888Emma Rice /
William John
Walsh
YesMac’s
Hotel
(1890c)
Mrs
Catherine
O’Connor
/ William
John
Walsh
Railway Hotel ?why was
this Hotel
being
rebuilt
in 1888?
Walter Parker /
DR McGregor
Yes
Mac’s Hotel

premises were
licensed at the
time of the fire
1895
(purp-

ortedly)
no record
found in
the local
Press !
James O’Farrell
/ William John
Walsh
YesMac’s
Hotel
(Feb 1896)
John
Stewart
/ Comm-
ercial Bank
Rose &
Crown Hotel

premises were
licensed at the
time of the fire
11 Sept
1896
Albert Edwin
Clayton /
George
Clayton
YesMargaret
Clayton /
George
Clayton
(1899)
the former –

Colonial Wine
License and
Billiard Hall
&
Parkers Hotel

and Boarding
House

premises had
been
delicensed for
about 10 years
at the time of
the fire
1902c
no record
found in
the local
Press – !
Mac’s Hotel

premises were
licensed at the
time of the fire
1905c
no record
found in
the local
Press !
Martha Irving
Phillips /
William John
Walsh
Yesas the
Tower Hotel
(1905)
John (Jack)
Keam
(licensee
&
owner)
Woodmans
Arms Hotel

(aka O’Dwyers
Hotel &
Wallan Hotel)

premises were
licensed at the
time of the fire
sometime
between
Sept &
Dec
1915
no record
found in
the local
Press !
O’Dwyer family YesWoodmans
Arms
Hotel
(1916)
the former –

Strangways
Hotel

premises had
been
delicensed for
about
55+ years at
the time of
the fire
was pulled
down in the
mid to late
1920s
Woodmans Arms
Hotel

premises were
licensed at the
time of the fire
28 Feb 1926
(building
was saved)
Gertrude Burns /
Mr & Mrs Evans
(1926)
the former –

Tower Hotel

premises had
been
delicensed for
about 10 years
at the time of
the fire

14 June
1926
Donald H Rae (owner)site remained
vacant for a
number of
years until the
Laffan Bros.
built a Garage
on site (1935)
– which was
also later
destroyed
by fire, and
rebuilt again.
the former –

Prince of Wales
/ Cameron’s
Hotel

premises had
been
delicensed for
about 33 years
at the time of
the fire
21 Nov
1927
NoWallan Police
Station &
Residence was
later built on
this site (1935)
by Mr P Forbes
of Darraweit
Guim, the land
having been
donated by
the owner in
B McConnell
Woodmans Arms Hotel

premises were
licensed at the
time of the fire
21 Aug
1935
Thomas Matthew
Burns &
Gertrude Burns
Yesas the Wallan
Hotel
(April 1937)
There was no local or Melbourne Press reporting made on at least three of the reputed Hotel fires in and around Wallan Wallan
That said the (excellent) Kilmore Examiner has not been accessed per this research
– and that it may provide some relevant detail

Part 8 – Misc.

PremisesLicenseeOwnerEarliest
Known
Date
Latest
Known
Date
Nett
Value
£
Beer ShopJ  Johnston
(Hotel and Beer
Shop Hand)
R
Hepburne
Sept
1865
Sept
1866
35
dittoJ  Johnston
(Hotel and Beer
Shop Hand)
R
Hepburne
Sept
1866
Sept
1867
36
dittoJ  Johnston
(Hotel and Beer
Shop Hand)
I O’NeillSept
1867
186836

The above Beer Shop is recorded as at Wallan Wallan in the Broadmeadows Rates Books for each year that it was licensed.  However the premises were actually on the Beveridge Rd (now Stockdale Rd) – about a half a mile west of the Tollgate Inn/Hotel that was run by the Cummins family in the 1860s This property later became the residence on the farm ‘Greendale’ owned by Richard Beach and afterwards by the McDonnell family who still retain the property. A little over 2 miles further to the west was the Olive Branch hotel, Darraweit Guim that was opened by the McCabe family in the 1870s and survived into the early 20th century. 

__________________________

On isolated occasions the ‘licensed establishments’ on top of Pretty Sally are also referred to as at/in Bylands, a couple of miles to the north of Big Hill.  There were indeed several licensed premises at Bylands itself and they are not included in this article.  They are as follows –

HotelDatesLocationOther
Glenalbion Hotel,
Bylands
1858c to
1862c 
NE corner of Allotment
70 (North of Bylands
township)
Situated two
thirds of distance
from Union to Vic-
toria Hotels (all  
three hotels were
on the left had
side of Sydney Rd)
Victoria Hotel,
Bylands
(also known as
McCaherys
Victoria Hotel &
McKays Hotel)
1862c to
1875c
Allotment 48 on the
SW corner of the ‘T’
junction of Sydney
and Wandong Rds

Nov 1863
reference to
Mr Smith‘s
house

Union Hotel,
Bylands
also known as
Plummers Union
Hotel,
Dudleys Union
Hotel
and
Lundeys Hotel’ 
pre 1857 to
Dec 1879, then
1881 and
1883 to 1888c
after which the
Hotel closed
permanently
(Hotel was not

open in both
1880 &
1882 ?)
Allotment 88 in the
NW corner at the  
crossroad within the
Bylands Township
(Sydney Rd and
Union Lane)
This hotel
is presently
being
researched
by Grahame
Thom (at
KHS)
       ?1865 to
1868c
Likely Allotment 69
or 70 on West side
of Sydney Rd at the
North end of the
Bylands township ?
Louis Le Nepveu
owned
Belle Vue
(Swinton)
farm near the
Kilmore Tollgate
in the Bylands
township
 Morphetts 1870 to 1871though recorded as
Bylands, was act-
ually at Dry Creek,
Morphett (later
Wandong)
Patrick ‘Paddy’
Morphett
– licensee 
the Rates
Book records
Hotel as at
Wallan Wallan,
however
is was located
next to the
Dry Creek at 
Morphett (later
Wandong)
 Morphetts
Hotel
 per above &
1874 to 1875
 ditto  ditto
     ?
(at Bylands)
       ?            ?Richard Fer(r)liau
was a licensee of
a Hotel and
P Cummins the
owner.
        ?Dec 1870
(new
application
for Beer
License)
           ?Edward O’Connor
(application sub-
sequently was not
approved –  per
the death of
Emma Whitley on
23 Dec 1870 (at
his illegal grog
-shanty
) of two
sitting rooms &
two bedrooms,
exclusive of
those required
by the family.
‘Publicans
License
&
‘Beer
License’
July 1878
to 1882
though recorded as
Bylands, was actually
at Dry Creek,
Morphett (Wandong)
George Frederick
Arkell  (farmer,
storekeeper &
‘publican’) next
to the Dry Creek

in Wandong,
County of Dal-
housie of seven
rooms exclusive
of those req-
uired for the use
of the family.

Per above – the name of George Frederick Arkell is associated with the pastoral pursuits upon and over the crest of Big Hill. However he was also a storekeeper many years. In the Broadmeadows Rates Book he is also recorded as of Big Hill and as being a publican in the period 1878 to 1882.  This license however was most likely a ‘beer license’ which was an extension of his business within his store, and this enabled him to sell beer, but it was not to be consumed on the store premises.  Arknell had seen the need and demand for a store near to where the NE railway was being built, and opened his business there in the early 1870s, and retaining it for near on two decades.  These premises however were not at Big Hill (per of the Rates Book entry), ) but were actually at Dry Creek, Morphett (which was later to be renamed as Wandong)  On 5 January 1920 at the age of  92, recorded as a straight forward man, George Frederick Arkell passed away at Moonee Ponds, Melbourne.  He was also a previous member of the Bylands and Glenburnie Road Board.  He had arrived in the Colony sometime around 1846.

Furthermore within are several newspaper cuttings (a small percentage of what is readily available), and those selected here are to give the reader an overall perspective of some of the subjected recorded and printed within the press for the readers here.

__________________________

It should also be noted by the reader that regarding the annual Rate Value of licensed premises that was calculated each September by the Merriang and Broadmeadows Councils and that there are some inconsistencies regarding Rateable amount.  That is because the Secretary in some years rated a Hotel and immediate land separately to any other acreage (Allotments) held.  On other occasions however the Hotel and all property owned were Rated as one.  Additionally aside from the above, the Allotment owners were known to have speculated in the buying and selling of Allotments, thus the total acreage owner overall held could and did vary year by year.

__________________________

Today the sole remaining licensed hotel is Wallan is Hogans Hotel after the recent demise of the old Railway Hotel (latter named ‘Rattlers’) in Wallan East. Whilst the Wallan Bowling Club Inc. and the Greenhill Club at the Greenhill Sports Reserve both holding restricted licenses.

________________________

Undoubtably there will be amendments and inclusions that will need to be made to this article – this research being nowhere being no where near complete (the Kilmore Advertiser not having been accessed at all). Indeed readers are welcome to make their own contribution to this article – whether it be by way of correction or the inclusion of additional of material. Any contribution used here will duly be given credit here.

________________________

Part 9 – Reference Sources

Treasure Trove Newspapers, Broadmeadows Shire Rates Books, National Library of Australia, Public Records Office of Victoria, Harold John Graham (1858-1929), Unpublished Manuscript of GF Sugden (1917), JW Payne, Kilmore Historical Society, Cremorne Community Centre, Billion Graves, shireatwar.com, wikipedia